scripturalist

scripturalist

(ˈskrɪptʃərəlɪst)
n
a literalist or translator obedient to the Scriptures
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Buddhadasa frequently explained arahantship in the journal in entirely scripturalist and hence orthodox, Thai modernist cultural language.
However, up to the present day, the norms and values of a dogmatic and scripturalist interpretation of Islam have not gained acceptance at the three pilgrimage sites to the extent that the local population is prepared to tolerate economic losses for the sake of these values voluntarily, or even to abandon these heterodox ritual practices entirely.
Commins' depiction of three portraits in the introduction provides a great summary of the differently oriented religious fervors of three generations who were central to the reform movement in Syria: customary interpretation of Islam, scripturalist (nass) reform, and Arabism.
Anti-clericalist, scripturalist jurists never accepted the trope of the extinct mujtahid, holding onto an understanding of ijtihad that was more similar to al-Shafi'i's conceptualization than to the multilayered understanding of later jurists.
Asad also rejects the dichotomy of folk Islam versus scripturalist Islam, a notion popularized by Ernest Gellner and Clifford Geertz.
He subjects Islam itself to the same criteria he uses to judge Bandarshah, as illustrated by his repeated denigration of exoteric (scripturalist) Islam or worldly materialistic Islam.
Tunisia- based researcher Monica Marks identified three major divisions of Salafism within Tunisia: Salafiyya 'Almiyya (usually translated as scientific Salafism, but which Marks believes is better understood as scripturalist Salafism), political Salafism, and Salafiyya Jihadiyya (Salafi-jihadism).
They also said that there was a movement to reform Pakistani Muslim names in the tradition of high scripturalist Wahabi-oriented Islam.
A somewhat problematic binary that is set up in the introduction and which is echoed in some of the individual contributions is the link made between what is described as "scripturalist Islam" ("scholastic, legalistic and doctrinal") and "radical Islam", an agglomerate then opposed to the "moderate Islam" marked by "flexible interpretations of major religious and legal sources" (p.
The tolerant unity of highly varied and broadly, but undogmatically, Sunni Islam was broken up by new 'scripturalist' demands to discard elements of ritual that were not directly based on instructions in the Qur'an and on sunnah and hadith, including celebrations of the Prophet's birthday (moulood) and worship centring on the tombs of holy men.
In Muslim history there were at least six major Sunni schools of law, with only four remaining (Hanbali, Hanafi, Maliki, Shafi'i); in Shia Islam there are two major approaches, usuli, based on deriving principles, and akhbari, a scripturalist posture that believes all answers are already written down in the Quran and the sayings of the Shiite saints.
This served to legitimize most anthropologists' ignorance of scripturalist Islam.