scroggie

scroggie

(ˈskrɒɡɪ)
adj, -gier or -giest
(Physical Geography) Scot having scrogs upon it
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
NEXTDC CEO Craig Scroggie comments 'Being honoured by those that are among the most respected analysts in the world is something we all feel very proud of.
Little Leo Scroggie, Skyla-Rose King, Lennon Ferguson and Amelia Rose Middleton are the youngest of the bunch, representing the 0-17 month category.
A Guide to the Gospels is a classic, seminal work of biblical scholarship by author William Graham Scroggie (1877-1958).
Heard GW, Robertson P and Scroggie M (2004) The Ecology and Conservation Status of the Growling Grass Frog (Litoria raniformis) within the Merri Creek Corridor.
Good Morning Britain viewers were ecstatic with the news that everything worked out for Scouser Liam Scroggie after his A Level disappointment last year.
In 2013, Dundee sheriff Kenneth Hogg cleared Rangers fan Richard Scroggie, 48, who had called Dundee United's Willo Flood a "Fenian b***d" at Tannadice.
Justin Scroggie, a partner at The Format People noted that, "the faltering talent-show genre is finding new traction by skewing younger, not only in music and performance, but also in cooking, business, fashion etc."
"Dickens's wife was from the city and, on a trip here, he visited Canongate Kirk graveyard and spotted the headstone of a man called Ebenezer Scroggie.