Scrooge


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Scrooge

also scrooge  (skro͞oj)
n.
A mean-spirited miserly person; a skinflint.

[After Ebenezer Scrooge, , miserly protagonist of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens.]

Scrooge

(skruːdʒ)
n
a mean or miserly person
[C19: after a character in Dickens' story A Christmas Carol (1843)]

Scrooge

(skrudʒ)

n.
1. Ebenezer, a miserly curmudgeon in Dickens' A Christmas Carol.
2. (often l.c.) any miserly person.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Scrooge - a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spendscrooge - a selfish person who is unwilling to give or spend
hoarder - a person who accumulates things and hides them away for future use
pinchgut - a niggardly person who starves himself (and others)

Scrooge

noun miser, penny-pincher (informal), skinflint, cheapskate (informal), tight-arse (taboo slang), tightwad (U.S. & Canad. slang), tight-ass (U.S. taboo slang), niggard, money-grubber (informal), meanie or meany (informal, chiefly Brit.) What a bunch of Scrooges.

Scrooge

also scrooge
noun
A stingy person:
Informal: penny pincher.
Translations
kitupiikki

Scrooge

[skruːdʒ] Nel avariento típico (personaje del "Christmas Carol" de Dickens)

Scrooge

[ˈskruːdʒ] nrat m

Scrooge

nGeizhals m
References in classic literature ?
But he was a tight-fisted hand at the grind- stone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous, old sinner!
External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, no wintry weather chill him.
Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, with gladsome looks, `My dear Scrooge, how are you?
Once upon a time -- of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve -- old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house.
The door of Scrooge's counting-house was open that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters.
It was the voice of Scrooge's nephew, who came upon him so quickly that this was the first intimation he had of his approach.
He had so heated himself with rapid walking in the fog and frost, this nephew of Scrooge's, that he was all in a glow; his face was ruddy and handsome; his eyes sparkled, and his breath smoked again.
`Christmas a humbug, uncle!' said Scrooge's nephew.
Scrooge having no better answer ready on the spur of the moment, said `Bah!' again; and followed it up with `Humbug.'
If I could work my will,' said Scrooge indignantly, `every idiot who goes about with "Merry Christmas" on his lips, should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.
`Let me leave it alone, then,' said Scrooge. `Much good may it do you!
`Let me hear another sound from you,' said Scrooge, `and you'll keep your Christmas by losing your situation!