scuttle

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scut·tle 1

 (skŭt′l)
n.
1. A small opening or hatch with a movable lid in the deck or hull of a ship or in the roof, wall, or floor of a building.
2. The lid or hatch of such an opening.
tr.v. scut·tled, scut·tling, scut·tles
1. Nautical
a. To cut or open a hole or holes in (a ship's hull).
b. To sink (a ship) by this means.
2. To thwart, ruin, or terminate: "a program [the] President ... sought to scuttle" (Christian Science Monitor).

[Middle English skottell, from Old French escoutille, possibly from Spanish escotilla.]

scut·tle 2

 (skŭt′l)
n.
1. A metal pail for carrying coal.
2. A shallow open basket for carrying vegetables, flowers, or grain.

[Middle English scutel, basket, from Old English, dish, from Latin scutella; see scullery.]

scut·tle 3

 (skŭt′l)
intr.v. scut·tled, scut·tling, scut·tles
To run or move with short hurried movements; scurry.
n.
A hurried run.

[Middle English scottlen; possibly akin to scud.]

scuttle

(ˈskʌtəl)
n
2. dialect chiefly Brit a shallow basket, esp for carrying vegetables
3. (Automotive Engineering) the part of a motor-car body lying immediately behind the bonnet
[Old English scutel trencher, from Latin scutella bowl, diminutive of scutra platter; related to Old Norse skutill, Old High German scuzzila, perhaps to Latin scūtum shield]

scuttle

(ˈskʌtəl)
vb
(intr) to run or move about with short hasty steps
n
a hurried pace or run
[C15: perhaps from scud, influenced by shuttle]

scuttle

(ˈskʌtəl)
vb
1. (Nautical Terms) (tr) nautical to cause (a vessel) to sink by opening the seacocks or making holes in the bottom
2. (tr) to give up (hopes, plans, etc)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a small hatch or its cover
[C15 (n): via Old French from Spanish escotilla a small opening, from escote opening in a piece of cloth, from escotar to cut out]

scut•tle1

(ˈskʌt l)

n.
1. a deep bucket for carrying coal.
2. a broad, shallow basket.
[before 1050; Middle English; Old English scutel dish, trencher, platter < Latin scutella, diminutive of scutra shallow pan]

scut•tle2

(ˈskʌt l)

v. -tled, -tling,
n. v.i.
1. to run with short, quick steps; scurry.
n.
2. a quick pace.
3. a short, hurried run.
[1400–50; late Middle English scottlynge (ger.), variant of scuddle, frequentative of scud1]

scut•tle3

(ˈskʌt l)

n., v. -tled, -tling. n.
1.
a. a small hatch or port in the deck, side, or bottom of a vessel.
b. a cover for this.
2. a small hatchlike opening in a roof or ceiling.
v.t.
3. to sink (a vessel) deliberately by opening seacocks or making openings in the bottom.
4. to abandon or destroy (plans, rumors, etc.).
[1490–1500; perhaps « Sp escotilla hatchway, derivative of escot(e) a cutting of cloth]

scuttle


Past participle: scuttled
Gerund: scuttling

Imperative
scuttle
scuttle
Present
I scuttle
you scuttle
he/she/it scuttles
we scuttle
you scuttle
they scuttle
Preterite
I scuttled
you scuttled
he/she/it scuttled
we scuttled
you scuttled
they scuttled
Present Continuous
I am scuttling
you are scuttling
he/she/it is scuttling
we are scuttling
you are scuttling
they are scuttling
Present Perfect
I have scuttled
you have scuttled
he/she/it has scuttled
we have scuttled
you have scuttled
they have scuttled
Past Continuous
I was scuttling
you were scuttling
he/she/it was scuttling
we were scuttling
you were scuttling
they were scuttling
Past Perfect
I had scuttled
you had scuttled
he/she/it had scuttled
we had scuttled
you had scuttled
they had scuttled
Future
I will scuttle
you will scuttle
he/she/it will scuttle
we will scuttle
you will scuttle
they will scuttle
Future Perfect
I will have scuttled
you will have scuttled
he/she/it will have scuttled
we will have scuttled
you will have scuttled
they will have scuttled
Future Continuous
I will be scuttling
you will be scuttling
he/she/it will be scuttling
we will be scuttling
you will be scuttling
they will be scuttling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been scuttling
you have been scuttling
he/she/it has been scuttling
we have been scuttling
you have been scuttling
they have been scuttling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been scuttling
you will have been scuttling
he/she/it will have been scuttling
we will have been scuttling
you will have been scuttling
they will have been scuttling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been scuttling
you had been scuttling
he/she/it had been scuttling
we had been scuttling
you had been scuttling
they had been scuttling
Conditional
I would scuttle
you would scuttle
he/she/it would scuttle
we would scuttle
you would scuttle
they would scuttle
Past Conditional
I would have scuttled
you would have scuttled
he/she/it would have scuttled
we would have scuttled
you would have scuttled
they would have scuttled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scuttle - container for coalscuttle - container for coal; shaped to permit pouring the coal onto the fire
container - any object that can be used to hold things (especially a large metal boxlike object of standardized dimensions that can be loaded from one form of transport to another)
2.scuttle - an entrance equipped with a hatchscuttle - an entrance equipped with a hatch; especially a passageway between decks of a ship
entrance, entranceway, entryway, entree, entry - something that provides access (to get in or get out); "they waited at the entrance to the garden"; "beggars waited just outside the entryway to the cathedral"
escape hatch - hatchway that provides a means of escape in an emergency
hatch - a movable barrier covering a hatchway
Verb1.scuttle - to move about or proceed hurriedly; "so terrified by the extraordinary ebbing of the sea that they scurried to higher ground"
crab - scurry sideways like a crab
run - move fast by using one's feet, with one foot off the ground at any given time; "Don't run--you'll be out of breath"; "The children ran to the store"

scuttle

verb
1. run, scurry, scamper, rush, hurry, scramble, hare (Brit. informal), bustle, beetle, scud, hasten, scoot, scutter (Brit. informal) Two very small children scuttled away.
2. wreck, destroy, ruin, overwhelm, disable, overthrow, foil, undo, torpedo, put paid to, discomfit Such threats could scuttle the peace conference.
Translations
يَفُرُّ، يُسْرِعُ بِخُطُواتٍ قَصيرَه
cupitatpotopit
pilesænke
gera gat á skipsbotn til aî sökkva òvískjótast, hraîa sér
muktnogremdēt kuģisteigties

scuttle

1 [ˈskʌtl] VT
1. [+ ship] → barrenar
2. (fig) [+ hopes, plans] → dar al traste con, echar por tierra

scuttle

2 [ˈskʌtl] VI (= run) → echar a correr
to scuttle away or offescabullirse
to scuttle alongcorrer, ir a toda prisa
we must scuttletenemos que marcharnos

scuttle

3 [ˈskʌtl] N (for coal) → cubo m, carbonera f

scuttle

[ˈskʌtəl]
n
(NAUTICAL, NAVAL)écoutille f
(also coal scuttle) → seau m (à charbon)
vt
(= scupper) [+ ship] → saborder
[+ plans, proposals, hopes] → abandonner
vi (= scamper) → détaler, s'enfuir à toutes jambes
scuttle away
scuttle off vis'enfuir à toutes jambes, détaler

scuttle

1
n (= coal scuttle)Kohleneimer m

scuttle

2
vi (person)trippeln; (animals)hoppeln; (spiders, crabs etc)krabbeln; she/it scuttled off in a hurrysie/es flitzte davon

scuttle

3 (Naut)
nLuke f
vt
(fig) treaty, agreement, talkssprengen; planskaputt machen

scuttle

1 [ˈskʌtl]
1. vt (ship) → autoaffondare
2. n
a. (Naut) → portellino
b. (also coal scuttle) → secchio del carbone

scuttle

2 [ˈskʌtl] vi to scuttle away or offfilare via
to scuttle in → entrare precipitosamente

scuttle1

(ˈskatl) verb
to hurry with short, quick steps.

scuttle2

(ˈskatl) verb
(of a ship's crew) to make a hole in (the ship) in order to sink it. The sailors scuttled the ship to prevent it falling into enemy hands.
References in classic literature ?
I stood out against it with all my might, was rather for scuttling the boat and perishing together among the sharks that followed us; but when Helmar said that if his proposal was accepted we should have drink, the sailor came round to him.
The scuttling of ex-HMAS Tobruk has handed more jobs to Bundaberg locals, ticking off another election commitment of the Palaszczuk Government.
Local magistrate Joseph Makinson was determined to stamp out this gang warfare, known as scuttling.
India's parliament stalemate continued yesterday, well into its fourth week, with the Narendra Modi-led government trading accusations with the Congress party-led opposition of scuttling attempts to resume a modicum of governance at the seat of Indian democracy.
The Ministry of Defence donated the 1970s built 'Kyrenia' patrol boat and Agriculture Minister Nicos Kouyialis said the scuttling of the vessel took place in the context of the government's "blue growth" policy, to form an artificial reef.
Minister of Agriculture Nicos Kouyialis said the scuttling of the vessel, the Kyrenia, was part of the government's blue growth policy to promote marine tourism in the area.
Last month Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak accused Israel of scuttling a deal to end Shalit's three-year captivity in the Gaza Strip, which is ruled by the Islamist Hamas faction, one of the groups that seized him.
If anything exposes the ``Bring LA Home'' program as the self-serving fraud it is, it's this sad tale of politics scuttling an earnest attempt at humane public policy.
Anyone else would have legged it ( but Aaron Balick decided to capture the giant centipede he found scuttling behind his TV.
Leaning over to gather up their skirts and then scuttling along with their toes digging into the floor, they seem furtive, as if they were looking for shelter.
Projected into the crease of a split screen that obliterates Jackson's head and torso, the two-channel video makes the freaky pop star only slightly creepier than usual, his sequined arms and legs scuttling along Pfeiffer's meticulously engineered vanishing point like a plump silverfish pinned in the gallery corner by beams of light.
For one, the roaches' scuttling legs did more than tickle the contestant.