seahound

seahound

(ˈsiːˌhaʊnd)
n
(Animals) a dogfish
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
ON A CAPE COD PIER is a fine time and place if you happen to be a snoozing seagull, some kid's forgotten pail of crabs, or selected higher forms of life such as Peter Taylor and Jeremiah Perry of the Harwichport fishing boat Seahound, the kind of people whose skill and fortitude may yet save New England's commercial fishery -- not to mention its fish.
No person has ever seen them, but now, sitting in his cabin, Seahound moving slowly along, Taylor is studying their ghostly contours on the screen of a sounding machine, and scribbling LORAN (Long Range Navigation) numbers in a notebook.
Taylor is captain and owner of Seahound, Perry is his mate, and both are hook-and-line fishermen.
Seahound is still moving purposefully along, the flag is bobbing behind the boat, and Taylor remains at his screen.
Otherwise, they could hang up on rocks." Suddenly -- many things aboard Seahound happen suddenly -- he calls to Perry, "Drop anchor," and moments later, with the anchor on the bottom and Seahound moving southward, the baited lines are fairly rocketing overboard.
There's no room for clumsy moves on Seahound's deck.
Perry is 27 and has mated on Seahound for nearly two years.
It takes Seahound south along Monomoy Island, around its tip and east-southeast, all the way defying 18-knot southwest winds that churn up a vicious little sea.
The first of the five sets has been out for nearly an hour when Seahound returns to one of its flags.
in the stern was an ancient symbol of a seahound's head--the name was Sea Venture." Thus is emblazoned the cut-glass mural depicting the Sea Venture's historic voyage, which ended in a shipwreck on Bermuda's treacherous rocks, and led to the initial European colonization of the islands.