seaport


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sea·port

 (sē′pôrt′)
n.
A harbor or town having facilities for seagoing ships.

seaport

(ˈsiːˌpɔːt)
n
1. a port or harbour accessible to seagoing vessels
2. a town or city located at such a place

sea•port

(ˈsiˌpɔrt, -ˌpoʊrt)

n.
1. a port or harbor that accommodates seagoing vessels.
2. a town or city at such a place.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seaport - a sheltered port where ships can take on or discharge cargoseaport - a sheltered port where ships can take on or discharge cargo
docking facility, dockage, dock - landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships are loaded and unloaded or repaired; may have gates to let water in or out; "the ship arrived at the dock more than a day late"
landing place, landing - structure providing a place where boats can land people or goods
seafront - the waterfront of a seaside town
port - a place (seaport or airport) where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country
coaling station - a seaport where ships can take on supplies of coal
port of call - any port where a ship stops except its home port
anchorage ground, anchorage - place for vessels to anchor
Translations
ميناء بَحْري
námořní přístav
havn
tengeri kikötõ
höfn, hafnarbær
námorný prístav

seaport

[ˈsiːpɔːt] Npuerto m de mar

seaport

sea port [ˈsiːpɔːrt] nport m de mersea power n [country] → puissance f navale

seaport

[ˈsiːˌpɔːt] nporto di mare or marittimo

sea

(siː) noun
1. (often with the) the mass of salt water covering most of the Earth's surface. I enjoy swimming in the sea; over land and sea; The sea is very deep here; (also adjective) A whale is a type of large sea animal.
2. a particular area of sea. the Baltic Sea; These fish are found in tropical seas.
3. a particular state of the sea. mountainous seas.
ˈseaward(s) adverb
towards the sea; away from the land. The yacht left the harbour and sailed seawards.
ˈseaboard noun
the seacoast. the eastern seaboard of the United States.
sea breeze
a breeze blowing from the sea towards the land.
ˈseafaring adjective
of work or travel on ships. a seafaring man.
ˈseafood noun
fish, especially shellfish.
adjective
seafood restaurants.
ˈseafront noun
a promenade or part of a town with its buildings facing the sea.
ˈsea-going adjective
designed and equipped for travelling on the sea. a sea-going yacht.
ˈseagull noun
a gull.
sea level
the level of the surface of the sea used as a base from which the height of land can be measured. three hundred metres above sea level.
ˈsea-lion noun
a type of large seal.
ˈseamanplural ˈseamen noun
a sailor, especially a member of a ship's crew who is not an officer.
ˈseaport noun
a port on the coast.
ˈseashell noun
the (empty) shell of a sea creature.
ˈseashore noun
the land close to the sea.
ˈseasick adjective
ill because of the motion of a ship at sea. Were you seasick on the voyage?
ˈseasickness noun
ˈseaside noun
(usually with the) a place beside the sea. We like to go to the seaside in the summer.
ˈseaweed noun
plants growing in the sea. The beach was covered with seaweed.
ˈseaworthy adjective
(negative unseaworthy) (of a ship) suitably built and in good enough condition to sail at sea.
ˈseaworthiness noun
at sea
1. on a ship and away from land. He has been at sea for four months.
2. puzzled or bewildered. Can I help you? You seem all at sea.
go to sea
to become a sailor. He wants to go to sea.
put to sea
to leave the land or a port. They planned to put to sea the next day.
References in classic literature ?
In thoroughfares nigh the docks, any considerable seaport will frequently offer to view the queerest looking nondescripts from foreign parts.
Thus his nails and modesty were comparable to those of most gentlemen; though his ambition had been educated only by the opportunities of a clerk and accountant in the smaller commercial houses of a seaport. He thought the rural Featherstones very simple absurd people, and they in their turn regarded his "bringing up" in a seaport town as an exaggeration of the monstrosity that their brother Peter, and still more Peter's property, should have had such belongings.
Wellington is trim and neat and English; it reminds you of a seaport town on the South Coast.
On the 21st of April, 1708, we sailed into the river of Clumegnig, which is a seaport town, at the south-east point of Luggnagg.
After two months' sailing we arrived at a seaport, where we disembarked and did a great trade.
"But how did you land at Osuna, senora," asked Don Quixote, "when it is not a seaport?"
-- We anchored in the Bay of Callao, the seaport of Lima, the capital of Peru.
I kept that most jealously out of sight; and I did the same with my naval academy which I had established at a remote seaport. Both were prospering to my satisfaction.
The beach was a kind of public promenade where were displayed all the vagaries of a seaport on the arrival of a fleet from a long cruise.
On the Saturday in that same week, I took my leave of Herbert - full of bright hope, but sad and sorry to leave me - as he sat on one of the seaport mail coaches.
This seaport of Smyrna, our first notable acquaintance in Asia, is a closely packed city of one hundred and thirty thousand inhabitants, and, like Constantinople, it has no outskirts.
He said he had a father in some English seaport, I forget which.