seatmate

seat·mate

 (sēt′māt′)
n.
A person sitting next to another on a conveyance such as an airplane: "His seatmate was a gray-haired woman with glasses" (Anne Tyler).

seatmate

(ˈsiːtmeɪt)
n
US the person who is sitting in the next seat

seat•mate

(ˈsitˌmeɪt)

n.
a person who occupies an adjoining seat.
References in periodicals archive ?
'After having heard the privilege speech of my seatmate, I commiserate, I empathize, I sympathize with his feelings right now.
You eyeroll at your seatmate as your junior officer puts on his pabibo moves on the boss.
Travelers were asked how likely they were to converse with their seatmate. Of the more than 200 respondents, just nine percent said they frequently speak to their seatmates and.
Whatever politicos may have expected, the freshman Democrat from Chandler is now representing Legislative District 17 in the state House alongside a Republican seatmate.
I once tried cheating in a Science quiz by asking my seatmate the answer, but our teacher caught me and was asked to stand at the back of the classroom facing the wall.
Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, when she realized her seatmate would be a toddler.
Between the two of us, surely my seatmate and I could get him out as well.
My seatmate calmed me down and made me realize that I was not stuck thinking about office drama all the time.
On an airplane on her way to the conference she listens to her seatmate reveal startling details about his family that he has obviously described to others before.
Though McCain was a towering figure who was elected to the Senate by Arizonans six times, the three Republican candidates running to replace his retiring seatmate, Sen.
The mostly silent passenger struggles to engage with the vehemence of his seatmate. Stuck in denial, he seeks distraction in innocuous personal emails in an attempt to keep the stranger at arm's length.