seats


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seat

 (sēt)
n.
1.
a. Something, such as a chair or bench, that may be sat on: There are comfortable seats in the waiting room.
b. The part on which one rests in sitting: the seat of a chair; a bicycle seat.
2.
a. A place in which one may sit: found a seat on the floor.
b. The right to occupy such a place or a ticket indicating this right: got seats for the concert.
3.
a. The buttocks.
b. The part of a garment that covers the buttocks.
4.
a. A part serving as the base of something else.
b. The surface or part on which another part sits or rests.
5.
a. The place where something is located or based: The heart is the seat of the emotions.
b. A center of authority; a capital: the county seat.
6. A place of abode or residence, especially a large house that is part of an estate: the squire's country seat.
7. Membership in an organization, such as a legislative body or stock exchange, that is obtained by appointment, election, or purchase.
8. The manner of sitting on a horse: a rider with a good seat.
v. seat·ed, seat·ing, seats
v.tr.
1.
a. To place in or on a seat.
b. To cause or assist to sit down: The ushers will seat the members of the bride's family.
2. To provide with a particular seat: The usher seated me in the back row.
3. To have or provide seats for: We can seat 300 in the auditorium.
4. To install in a position of authority or eminence.
5. To fix firmly in place: seat an ammunition clip in an automatic rifle.
v.intr.
To rest on or fit into another part: The O-rings had not seated correctly in their grooves.
Idiom:
by the seat of (one's) pants Informal
1. In a manner based on intuition and experience rather than method: He ran the business by the seat of his pants.
2. Without the use of instruments: an inexperienced pilot who had to fly the aircraft by the seat of her pants.

[Middle English sete, probably from Old Norse sæti; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

seats

  • dress circle - So called because it is a circular row of seats at an entertainment, the spectators of which are expected to be in dress clothes.
  • sedile - A seat by the altar for a member of the church clergy.
  • tandem - From Latin, literally "eventually, at length," and then, metaphorically, "acting conjointly"; in the 1880s, it was transferred from a two-horse carriage to a bicycle with two seats, one behind the other.
  • circus - Latin for "ring," its first use was for the arena of Roman antiquity, an oval or circular area enclosed by tiers of seats and usually covered by a tent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seats - an area that includes places where several people can sitseats - an area that includes places where several people can sit; "there is seating for 40 students in this classroom"
dress circle, circle - a curved section or tier of seats in a hall or theater or opera house; usually the first tier above the orchestra; "they had excellent seats in the dress circle"
orchestra - seating on the main floor in a theater
parquet - seating on the main floor between the orchestra and the parquet circle
parquet circle, parterre - seating at the rear of the main floor (beneath the balconies)
ringside, ringside seat - first row of seating; has an unobstructed view of a boxing or wrestling ring
seat - furniture that is designed for sitting on; "there were not enough seats for all the guests"
stall - seating in the forward part of the main level of a theater
tiered seat - seating that is arranged in sloping tiers so that spectators in the back can see over the heads of those in front
elbow room, room, way - space for movement; "room to pass"; "make way for"; "hardly enough elbow room to turn around"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Yes, he must bring out seats and food for both, and in serving us present not ewer and napkin with more show of respect to the one than to the other.
Neither do I reckon it an ill seat, only where the air is unwholesome; but likewise where the air is unequal; as you shall see many fine seats set upon a knap of ground, environed with higher hills round about it; whereby the heat of the sun is pent in, and the wind gathereth as in troughs; so as you shall have, and that suddenly, as great diversity of heat and cold as if you dwelt in several places.
They found all the rest of the party already in their seats and the curtain about to go up.
Not less than mine became her desire that I should have my way - but, ah, the iron seats in that park of horrible repute, and that bare room at the top of many flights of stairs
In the Gardens, too, he seemed ever to take the sward rather than the seats, perhaps a wise preference, but he had an unusual way of sitting down.
The chief were those who from the Pit of Hell Roaming to seek their prey on earth, durst fix Their Seats long after next the Seat of God, Their Altars by his Altar, Gods ador'd Among the Nations round, and durst abide JEHOVAH thundring out of SION, thron'd Between the Cherubim; yea, often plac'd Within his Sanctuary it self their Shrines, Abominations; and with cursed things His holy Rites, and solemn Feasts profan'd, And with their darkness durst affront his light.
The seats were higher in the back of the room, and the more advanced and longer-legged pupils sat there, the position being greatly to be envied, as they were at once nearer to the windows and farther from the teacher.
If you would have me do battle with Menelaus, bid the Trojans and Achaeans take their seats, while he and I fight in their midst for Helen and all her wealth.
The occupants of this seat are invisible to the great body of spectators, inasmuch as they sit on a much lower level than either the barristers or the audience, whose seats are raised above the floor.
Round the skins six of the men belonging to the fold seated themselves, having first with rough politeness pressed Don Quixote to take a seat upon a trough which they placed for him upside down.
As he spoke he sprang from his seat, threw his crimson cloak from him, and took his sword from his shoulder.
Nor can any son of mortal woman, for the first time, seat himself amid those hempen intricacies, and while straining his utmost at the oar, bethink him that at any unknown instant the harpoon may be darted, and all these horrible contortions be put in play like ringed lightnings; he cannot be thus circumstanced without a shudder that makes the very marrow in his bones to quiver in him like a shaken jelly.