secluded


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se·clud·ed

 (sĭ-klo͞o′dĭd)
adj.
1. Removed or remote from others; solitary: a secluded freelancer working in his basement.
2. Screened from view; sequestered: a secluded cabin.

se·clud′ed·ly adv.

secluded

(sɪˈkluːdɪd)
adj
1. kept apart from the company of others: a secluded life.
2. sheltered; private
seˈcludedly adv
seˈcludedness n

se•clud•ed

(sɪˈklu dɪd)

adj.
1. sheltered or screened from general activity or view.
2. withdrawn from human contact: a secluded life.
[1595–1605]
se•clud′ed•ly, adv.
se•clud′ed•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.secluded - hidden from general view or use; "a privy place to rest and think"; "a secluded romantic spot"; "a secret garden"
private - confined to particular persons or groups or providing privacy; "a private place"; "private discussions"; "private lessons"; "a private club"; "a private secretary"; "private property"; "the former President is now a private citizen"; "public figures struggle to maintain a private life"
2.secluded - providing privacy or seclusion; "the cloistered academic world of books"; "sat close together in the sequestered pergola"; "sitting under the reclusive calm of a shade tree"; "a secluded romantic spot"
private - confined to particular persons or groups or providing privacy; "a private place"; "private discussions"; "private lessons"; "a private club"; "a private secretary"; "private property"; "the former President is now a private citizen"; "public figures struggle to maintain a private life"

secluded

secluded

adjective
1. Solitary and shut off from society:
2. Far from centers of human population:
3. Concealed from view:
Translations
مُنْعَزِل
odlehlýskrytý
afsides
einangraîur, afvikinn
atsiskyręs
atšķirtsnomaļšvientuļš
gözlerden ıraktenha

secluded

[sɪˈkluːdɪd] ADJretirado, apartado

secluded

[sɪˈkluːdɪd] adj [beach, cove, area, spot, cottage, corner, garden] → retiré(e)

secluded

adj spot, houseabgelegen; lifezurückgezogen, abgeschieden

secluded

[sɪˈkluːdɪd] adj (house) → appartato/a, isolato/a; (life) → ritirato/a

secluded

(siˈkluːdid) adjective
not able to be seen, talked to etc by other people; far away from other people etc. a secluded cottage.
seˈclusion (-ʒən) noun
the state of being secluded; privacy. She wept in the seclusion of her own room.
References in classic literature ?
Any one possessing a mile or two of secluded seaboard, cut off on the land side by precipitous approaches, and including a sheltered river mouth ingeniously hidden by nature, in the form of a jutting wall of rock, from the sea, might have made as good use of these natural opportunities as the nobleman in question, had they only been as wise and as rich.
He found them encamped in a secluded part of the country, at the head of a small stream.
As the sky grew less gloomy; indeed, began to grow a little genial, he became still less and less a recluse; as if, when the ship had sailed from home, nothing but the dead wintry bleakness of the sea had then kept him so secluded.
We are residing in the secluded village of Ruswarp, on the banks of the Esk, about two miles inland from Whitby.
But in time the airships may cause us trouble," continued Ozma, "for if the earth folk learn how to manage them we would be overrun with visitors who would ruin our lovely, secluded fairyland.
So secluded was the life led by the two, father and daughter, that they showed themselves only at a few official receptions and, at certain times in the year, in two or three friendly drawing-rooms, where the fame of the professor and the beauty of Mathilde made a sensation.
I would show Rose Maylie in all the bloom and grace of early womanhood, shedding on her secluded path in life soft and gentle light, that fell on all who trod it with her, and shone into their hearts.
These being now either dead or secluded in their infirm glory, she made her house a meeting-place for her own relations, to whom she would lament the passing of the great days of the nineteenth century, when every department of letters and art was represented in England by two or three illustrious names.
And what's more," said Samson Carrasco, "I am, as all the world knows, a very famous poet, and I'll be always making verses, pastoral, or courtly, or as it may come into my head, to pass away our time in those secluded regions where we shall be roaming.
Thus chatting pleasantly the band turned back into the woodland and sought their secluded dell, where the trees were the thickest, the moss was the softest, and a secret path led to a cave, at once a retreat and a stronghold.
It was likely, for no one seemed to know the world more familiarly; there was no spot so secluded that he did not appear to have an intimate acquaintance with it.
These restless marauders, as has already been observed, are apt to be continually on the prowl about the skirts of the mountains; and even when encamped in some deep and secluded glen, they keep scouts upon the cliffs and promontories, who, unseen themselves, can discern every living thing that moves over the subjacent plains and valleys.