seclusion


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

se·clu·sion

 (sĭ-klo͞o′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of secluding: The judge ordered the seclusion of the jury.
b. The state of being secluded: the seclusion of the desert.
2. Archaic A secluded place or abode.

[Medieval Latin sēclūsiō, sēclūsiōn-, from Latin sēclūsus, past participle of sēclūdere, to seclude; see seclude.]

se·clu′sive (-sĭv, -zĭv) adj.
se·clu′sive·ly adv.

seclusion

(sɪˈkluːʒən)
n
1. the act of secluding or the state of being secluded
2. a secluded place
[C17: from Medieval Latin sēclūsiō; see seclude]

se•clu•sion

(sɪˈklu ʒən)

n.
1. an act of secluding.
2. the state of being secluded; solitude.
3. a secluded place.
[1615–25; < Medieval Latin sēclūsiō]
se•clu′sive, adj.
se•clu′sive•ly, adv.
se•clu′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seclusion - the quality of being secluded from the presence or view of othersseclusion - the quality of being secluded from the presence or view of others
reclusiveness - a disposition to prefer seclusion or isolation
2.seclusion - the act of secluding yourself from others
separation - the social act of separating or parting company; "the separation of church and state"
cocooning - retreating to the seclusion of your home (as for privacy or escape)

seclusion

noun privacy, isolation, solitude, hiding, retirement, shelter, retreat, remoteness, ivory tower, concealment, purdah They love the seclusion of their garden.

seclusion

noun
The act of secluding or the state of being secluded:
Translations
عُزْلَه، إنْعِزال
izolacesoukromí
tilbagetrukkethed
elvonultság
einangrun; einvera

seclusion

[sɪˈkluːʒən] Naislamiento m
to live in seclusionvivir aislado

seclusion

[sɪˈkluːʒən] nsolitude f
in seclusion → placé(e) à l'isolement
in seclusion from the world → à l'écart du monde

seclusion

n (= act of secluding)Absondern nt, → Absonderung f; (= being secluded)Abgeschlossenheit f, → Abgeschiedenheit f; (of house, spot)Abgelegenheit f; in seclusion from the worldin Weltabgeschiedenheit

seclusion

[sɪˈkluːʒn] nisolamento
to live in seclusion → fare vita ritirata

secluded

(siˈkluːdid) adjective
not able to be seen, talked to etc by other people; far away from other people etc. a secluded cottage.
seˈclusion (-ʒən) noun
the state of being secluded; privacy. She wept in the seclusion of her own room.
References in classic literature ?
In America, as everyone knows, girls early sign the declaration of independence, and enjoy their freedom with republican zest, but the young matrons usually abdicate with the first heir to the throne and go into a seclusion almost as close as a French nunnery, though by no means as quiet.
It seemed, in truth, to be a spot devoted to seclusion, and the sisters imbibed a soothing impression of security, as they gazed upon its romantic though not unappalling beauties.
Carr and his daughters were installed in a new house, built near the site of the double cabin, which was again transferred to the settlement, in order to give greater seclusion to the fair guests.
And inaudible, too, by mortal ear, but heard with all-comprehending love and pity in the farthest heaven, that almost agony of prayer --now whispered, now a groan, now a struggling silence--wherewith she besought the Divine assistance through the day Evidently, this is to be a day of more than ordinary trial to Miss Hepzibah, who, for above a quarter of a century gone by, has dwelt in strict seclusion, taking no part in the business of life, and just as little in its intercourse and pleasures.
Notwithstanding his high native gifts and scholar-like attainments, there was an air about this young minister -- an apprehensive, a startled, a half-frightened look -- as of a being who felt himself quite astray, and at a loss in the pathway of human existence, and could only be at ease in some seclusion of his own.
And when these things unite in a man of greatly superior natural force, with a globular brain and a ponderous heart; who has also by the stillness and seclusion of many long night-watches in the remotest waters, and beneath constellations never seen here at the north, been led to think untraditionally and independently; receiving all nature's sweet or savage impressions fresh from her own virgin voluntary and confiding breast, and thereby chiefly, but with some help from accidental advantages, to learn a bold and nervous lofty language --that man makes one in a whole nation's census --a mighty pageant creature, formed for noble tragedies.
Smyth, with little Harry, sought the seclusion of the ladies' cabin, where the dark beauty of the supposed little girl drew many flattering comments from the passengers.
These days of confinement would have been, but for her private perplexities, remarkably comfortable, as such seclusion exactly suited her brother, whose feelings must always be of great importance to his companions; and he had, besides, so thoroughly cleared off his illhumour at Randalls, that his amiableness never failed him during the rest of his stay at Hartfield.
But at length she was secured by the exertions of Elinor, who greatly disapproved such continual seclusion.
Farther off were hills: not so lofty as those round Lowood, nor so craggy, nor so like barriers of separation from the living world; but yet quiet and lonely hills enough, and seeming to embrace Thornfield with a seclusion I had not expected to find existent so near the stirring locality of Millcote.
Grief, and that together, transformed him into a complete hermit: he threw up his office of magistrate, ceased even to attend church, avoided the village on all occasions, and spent a life of entire seclusion within the limits of his park and grounds; only varied by solitary rambles on the moors, and visits to the grave of his wife, mostly at evening, or early morning before other wanderers were abroad.
Surely, the grand old Bible name -- suggestive of a sad and somber dignity; recalling, in its first association, mournful ideas of penitence and seclusion -- had been here, as events had turned out, inappropriately bestowed?