second chamber


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second chamber

n
(Parliamentary Procedure) the upper house of a bicameral legislative assembly
References in classic literature ?
to the left!" cried Biscarrat, who, in his first assault, had seen the passage to the second chamber, and who, animated by the smell of powder, wished to guide his soldiers in that direction.
And when he had let fall these words, with his accustomed gravity, Monsieur turned his eyes, in a certain manner, upon the people of his suite, so that all, pages, officers, and equerries, quitted the service, knives and goblets, and made towards the second chamber a retreat as rapid as it was disorderly.
They passed through another corridor and then into a second chamber, larger than the first and more brilliantly illuminated.
The Plaid peer and ex-Caernarfon MP believes there is a role for a second chamber but has pressed for a switch to an elected model.
His idea was that the person who came second in the Westminster election should go to the second chamber. Not as a constituency representative but as a scrutiniser of the Commons.
There are nearly 800 members of Westminster's second chamber, all of them paid PS300 a day just for turning up.
It is difficult to defend having a second chamber composed in the way our one is.
Senior Liberal Democrat peer John Shipley, a former leader of Newcastle City Council, confirmed his readiness to stand after the Government yesterday set out plans to overhaul the second chamber.
A party should have roughly the same number in the Second Chamber as in the Commons.
Whatever name is given to the second chamber of Parliament, the argument used to justify electing the members is that it is democratic.
But the title for the new second chamber has yet to be decided.