second person


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Related to second person: third person

person

Grammatical person refers to the perspectives of the personal pronouns used to identify a person in speech and text—that is, it distinguishes between a speaker (first person), an addressee (second person), and others beyond that (third person).
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second person

n.
1. The grammatical category of forms that designate the person addressed. Examples of forms in the second person include English pronouns such as you and verb forms such as Spanish hablas "you speak."
2. A discourse or literary style in which the narrator recounts his or her own experiences or impressions using such forms: a story told in the second person.

sec′ond-per′son adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

second person

n
(Linguistics) a grammatical category of pronouns and verbs used when referring to or describing the individual or individuals being addressed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sec′ond per′son


n.
1. the grammatical person used in an utterance in referring to the one or ones being addressed.
2. a pronoun or verb form in the second person, as the pronoun you.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.second person - pronouns and verbs used to refer to the person addressed by the language in which they occur
person - a grammatical category used in the classification of pronouns, possessive determiners, and verb forms according to whether they indicate the speaker, the addressee, or a third party; "stop talking about yourself in the third person"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
druhá osoba
önnur persóna
tweede persoon
druhá osoba
druga oseba
References in classic literature ?
Lecount takes the business in hand and lays a trap for me -- I decline her tempting invitation by becoming totally ignorant of the whole affair the instant any second person appears in it.
Dowlas consented to go as a second person disinclined to act officially; and so poor Silas, furnished with some old coverings, turned out with his two companions into the rain again, thinking of the long night-hours before him, not as those do who long to rest, but as those who expect to "watch for the morning".
"Ach, Herr Carey, Sie mussen mir nicht du sagen--you mustn't talk to me in the second person singular."
Oliva investigates the use of first and second person in Peninsular Spanish as a complex array of functional strategies for developing cognitive representations of the speaker and other people and entities.
Given what happened--what you did," gripes the first, adding, a few moments later, "So you've ditched celibacy then?" First person subsequently tries to interest second person in joining a betting ring, to which nineteen people are currently signed up and for which twenty are needed.
Despite Booth's historically-dated claims in The Rhetoric of Fiction that "efforts to use the second person have never been very successful [...
Let us return to the traditional blessing formula: "Barukh attah Adonai, elohenu melekh ha-olam, asher..." "Blessed be You, O Lord our God, sovereign of the universe, who...." Those praying address God in the second person as "You O Lord." This Lord is then referred to in the third person as the sovereign of the universe who does such-and-such, for example "who commanded us to do something" or "who creates the fruit of the vine." Critics have focused on two problems in this formula--grammatical mixture and gender--and tried to amend it with two radically different solutions.
There are four different points of view used in fiction: first person, second person, third person and omniscient.
a list of criticism on the second person and address in general, on second-person narrative, and on second-person uses in poetry;

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