dentin

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Related to secondary dentin: reparative dentin

den·tin

 (dĕn′tĭn) or den·tine (-tēn′)
n.
The main, calcareous part of a tooth, beneath the enamel and surrounding the pulp chamber and root canals.

den′tin·al (dĕn′tə-nəl, dĕn-tē′-) adj.

den•tin

(ˈdɛn tn, -tɪn)

also den•tine

(-tin)

n.
the hard, calcareous tissue, similar to but denser than bone, that forms the major portion of a tooth, surrounds the pulp cavity, and is situated beneath the enamel and cementum.
[1830–40; < Latin dent-, s. of dēns tooth + -in1]
den′tin•al, adj.

den·tin

(dĕn′tĭn)
The main bony part of a tooth beneath the enamel, surrounding the pulp chamber and root canals.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dentin - a calcareous material harder and denser than bone that comprises the bulk of a toothdentin - a calcareous material harder and denser than bone that comprises the bulk of a tooth
animal material - material derived from animals
ivory, tusk - a hard smooth ivory colored dentine that makes up most of the tusks of elephants and walruses
2.dentin - bone (calcified tissue) surrounding the pulp cavity of a tooth
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
tooth - hard bonelike structures in the jaws of vertebrates; used for biting and chewing or for attack and defense
Translations

den·tin

n. dentina, marfil dentario, tejido calcificado de un diente.

dentin

n dentina
References in periodicals archive ?
With age, secondary dentin and reparative dentin continue to deposit, so many scholars select secondary dentin deposition as an age-related research indicator, but this study can only be carried out on the corpse (Bommannavar & Kulkarni, 2015; Chopra et al., 2015; Kaur, et al., 2015; Klumb et al., 2016).
Initially, the pulp is responsible for the formation of the primary dentin, and in the fully formed tooth for the formation of secondary dentin. Denticles may be caused by fibroblasts by differentiation of secondary fibroblasts into cells producing hard tissue [1].
Pulp and any areas of secondary dentin formation were abraded off--secondary dentin identified based on its darker color and glossier texture than primary dentin--and teeth with carious lesions were avoided, in order to minimize the potential effects of in vivo dentin turnover (Roberts-Clark and Smith 2000).