secondary succession


Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

secondary succession

n.
The ecological succession of plant and animal communities in a disturbed area where topsoil has been retained, as in an area that has been recently burned by fire.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to the advantages of low cost and rapid data collection, this method has been used to test theories on secondary succession on the vegetation (FRELICH, 1992; BARNES, et al.
Moreover, they contribute to the deposition of seeds in disturbed habitats (Wunderle, 1997) and initiation of secondary succession (Charles-Dominique, 1986).
Successional management takes into account the ecological processes that drive secondary succession (variables implied in the disturbances, competition, species composition before the disturbance and their ecological performances) to have successful weed control in areas of restoration in the long-term (KRUEGER-MANGOLD et al.
Many studies report that secondary succession can recover the properties of degraded soil and maintain soil fertility (Feldpausch et al.
Our hypothesis was that 10 years after the completion of the ecological restoration-intervention, the community of herbivores and rates of herbivory would be similar to those of natural forests that have undergone secondary succession for longer periods of time.
Consequently , the process of secondary succession , which in the medium term will result in the restoration and maintenance of the forest , contributing to climate change mitigation , carbon sequestration and soil improvement and increasing the density will be favored the honey flora ( in terms of species and individuals ) and thus mainly in the medium term have better flowering and therefore better production , this involves creating incentives for conservation of Mt.
Secondary succession occurs in areas where a disturbance affects a previously existing original plant community.
2002), and a study of secondary succession in Virginia examined the effects of different-sized mammals, including deer, on vegetation during the first four years after release from agriculture (Bowers, 1993).
Shifting cultivation and secondary succession in the tropics.
1979) showed an increase in total organic matter followed by a slight decline along a secondary succession chronosequence.
Even though the Brazilian Forest Code (1965) and the National System of Conservation Units-SNUC (2000) now protect most of these areas, forests were severely damaged in the past, and most of the present vegetation is at an early to an intermediate stage of secondary succession.