secondhand smoke


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secondhand smoke

n.
Tobacco smoke that is inhaled by nonsmokers. Also called passive smoke.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sec′ondhand smoke′


n.
tobacco smoke involuntarily inhaled.
[1975–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Secondhand smoke from cigarettes has long been linked to numerous health problems, including severe asthma, respiratory infections and ear infections.
Secondhand smoke, also called passive smoking, can come from two sources-smoke that comes from burning tobacco or smoke that is exhaled by a person smoking.
Airport officials previously defended the smoking lounges, claiming they also benefited non-smokers by keeping secondhand smoke away from non-smoking guests.
"Avoid exposure to secondhand smoke regardless of whether the smoker is still in the room," said study author Professor Byung Jin Kim, of Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
[USA], May 3 (ANI): A non-smoker should leave a smoky room or car until it has been cleared, suggest researchers as secondhand smoke can cause high blood pressure and hypertension.
According to the National Health Service, secondhand smoke comes from the tip of a lit cigarette and the smoke that the smoker breathes out.
Exposure to secondhand smoke from burning tobacco products can cause sudden infant death syndrome, respiratory infections, ear infections, and asthma attacks in infants and children, and coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer in adult nonsmokers (1).
A new study suggests that long-term exposure to secondhand smoke during childhood increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) death in adulthood.
When non-smokers breathe in secondhand smoke - also known as passive smoking - it can be harmful.
A previous CDC study documented that secondhand smoke can transfer from designated smoking areas into nonsmoking areas in airports, where nonsmoking travelers and employees can be exposed.