secret ballot

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secret ballot

n.
1. A type of voting in which each person's vote is kept secret, but the amassed votes of various groups are revealed publicly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.secret ballot - a vote in which each person's choice is secret but the totaled votes are public
balloting, vote, voting, ballot - a choice that is made by counting the number of people in favor of each alternative; "there were only 17 votes in favor of the motion"; "they allowed just one vote per person"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
There were one thousand five hundred Patricians; from these, three hundred Senators were chosen; from the Senators a Doge and a Council of Ten were selected, and by secret ballot the Ten chose from their own number a Council of Three.
The election is being held through secret ballots simultaneously at the parliament house and the four provincial assemblies.
He added: "Labour MPs are scurrying around texting each other about secret ballots - so much for introducing a new culture of transparency and openness."
(151) The proposed constitutional amendment requiring secret ballots does not just require secret ballot elections for unions--it applies generally to all elections, including union elections.
Four out of five people surveyed support secret ballots in union-organizing elections, according to a new conducted for the National Retail Federation by Worthington, Ohio-based BIGresearch.The nationwide survey of 8,667 U.S.
"Secret ballots are good for democracies; they should be good for union elections as well.
The Employee Free Choice Act would replace secret ballots with public voting and require unionization if a majority sign authorization cards.
When British MPs eventually elect a Speaker, they will cast secret ballots, as do their Canadian counterparts, in a series of rounds with candidates eliminated until one candidate gains more than half of the votes.
Unions threaten a coordinated strike across a range of services if they get a "yes" vote from members in secret ballots.
With 408 secret ballots cast and 5 abstentions, 220 or 54% of the delegates rejected the resolution, while 183 or 46% voted in the affirmative.
Traditionally in America, every aspect of the electoral process, save for the marking of secret ballots, has been totally open to public scrutiny.
It frightens me that we are encouraging people to give up their secret ballots because the military mail service might be too slow.