secretagogue

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se·cre·ta·gogue

 (sĭ-krē′tə-gôg′, -gŏg′)
n.
A hormone or another agent that causes or stimulates secretion.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

secretagogue

(sɪˈkriːtəɡɒɡ)
n
(Medicine) med a substance that stimulates secretion
seˌcretaˈgogic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

se·cre·ta·gogue

, secretogogue
n. secretogogo, agente que estimula la secreción glandular.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
By drug class, the global diabetes drug market has been segmented into insulin, sensitizers, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, SGLT-2 inhibitors, secretagogues, peptide analogs, and others.
The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) mediates the different actions of the synthetic growth hormone secretagogues (GHS) and the endogenous ligand of this receptor, ghrelin (6).
Treatments considered in the second step include tea tree oil treatment for Demodex, preservative-free artificial tears (to avoid the toxic effects of preservatives), punctal plugs, moisture chamber devices and goggles to maintain moisture and temperature, overnight ointment application, removing blockages from the meibomian glands using a warming and expression device (such as Lipiflow), intense pulsed light therapy for MGD, and topical administration of drugs such as corticosteroids, antibiotics, secretagogues, non-glucocorticoid immunomodulators (cyclosporine and tacrolimus (24)), LFA-1 antagonist drugs (lifitegrast), and oral macrolide or tetracycline antibiotics.
Physicians were counseled to stop secretagogues and move patients to premixed insulins at 80% of their former total daily analogue dose, two-thirds at breakfast, and one-third at dinner, with appropriate follow-up.
Well-controlled patients with short acting insulin secretagogues
The use of insulin secretagogues (sulfonylureas, glinides, DPP-4 inhibitors, and GLP-1 receptor agonists) and other glucose-lowering agents (biguanides, thiazolidines, [alpha]-glucosidase inhibitors, and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors) was significantly more frequent in group A (77.9% and 65.6%, resp.) and less frequent in group C (30.0% and 33.3%, resp.) (P <0.001 and P < 0.001, resp.).
(13) In these methods, piezoelectric lithotripter is used to deliver a shock wave and reduce calculi to small fragments that are then flushed out of the duct with spontaneous salivation or the use of secretagogues.
Historically, type 2 diabetes was treated with non-insulin medications aimed at reducing hyperglycemia and insulin resistance, such as insulin secretagogues, insulin sensitizers, and drugs that impair absorption of ingested carbohydrates.
However, alcohol consumption may increase the risk of delayed hypoglycaemia, especially in persons on insulin or insulin secretagogues. It may also precipitate hyperglycaemia, as many 'empty calories' are consumed in the form of alcohol, and as calorie-dense snacks often accompany its use.
"Patients taking metformin, short-acting insulin secretagogues, sulphonylureas drugs or insulin will need to make adjustments to dose and or timings to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia while maintaining good glycemic control," the endocrinologist said.
Shuler, BS, DDS, CCN, LN, is involved in immunoncology for the prevention and treatment of cancer, human growth hormone secretagogues, and osteoporosis.
So recently growth hormone secretagogues are discovered which provide a more physiological route for the release of growth hormone8.
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