sectionalism

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sec·tion·al·ism

 (sĕk′shə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
Excessive devotion to local interests and customs.

sec′tion·al·ist n.

sectionalism

(ˈsɛkʃənəˌlɪzəm)
n
excessive or narrow-minded concern for local or regional interests as opposed to the interests of the whole
ˈsectionalist n, adj

sec•tion•al•ism

(ˈsɛk ʃə nlˌɪz əm)

n.
narrow-minded concern with regional interests.
[1850–55, Amer.]
sec′tion•al•ist, n.

sectionalism

an excessive devotion to the interests of one particular section of a country or community. — sectionalist, n.
See also: Government

sectionalism

The tendency to favor or oppose territorial expansion, tariffs, and other economic measures according to state rather than national interests.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sectionalism - a partiality for some particular place
partisanship, partiality - an inclination to favor one group or view or opinion over alternatives
Translations

sectionalism

[ˈsekʃənəlɪzəm] Nfaccionalismo m

sectionalism

References in periodicals archive ?
in many ways, the Liberals were let off the hook for their general lack of pro-union initiatives on the labour relations front because they managed to retain support from a number of influential unions whose sectionalist priorities had been addressed by the government.
The author's suggestion that the "blundering generation" thesis of Civil War causality is weakened by the ability of political and personal relationship matrices to deflect sectionalist impulses is undermined by her statement that secession was a "rejection of federal politics"--presumably, the very politics just touted as so successful (4-5).
In dissent, Michael Todd Landis joins a growing band of anti-Polk critics who view him as a proslavery sectionalist.
Union renewal in the form of adding a "class sensibility," with all this implies, to the sectionalist foundation of unions, is a central precondition for broader social change.
He added that these remarks which were made by an official who is "submitted to the rule of reserve" would feed sectionalist feelings and damage the prestige of the military institution which enjoys total national consensus around it.
Argues that, "faced with a splintering American nation and the possibility of a militarized Mason-Dixon line, the antebellum Whitman conceived of the Atlantic as the single relevant national border," leading him--"in an improbable bid to exchange sectionalism for Anglophobia"--to attack "the obstacles of sectionalism and transatlantic influence by treating them as part of the same problem, building his reputation as an authentically American writer through a strategic conflation of sectionalist and transatlantic pressures"; examines how Whitman's antislavery writings "pass over the South as the primary object of criticism, and .
The upshot of Lincoln's refutation is that sectionalist appeal is not a valid basis on which to judge the soundness of a party's political principles--which was Lincoln's position in the first place.
Also, the sectionalist allegiance will become a means to preserve political or personal gains or to seize them from others in power.
The pursuit of singular compulsions and activities militated against a more capacious understanding; for this reason, and in this context, Arnold attributed--as O'Grady would do--aspects of modernity to Hebraic and Semitic "fanaticism," a fanaticism which, for both authors, held to a narrowly religious and sectionalist view of human motivation.
Calhoun, ardent nationalist in the War of 1812, secretary of war, and two-time vice president who became the first great sectionalist leader during the nullification crisis of 1832.
He acknowledges the truly international perspective informing the United Irishmen project and Irish republicanism in general, suggesting that there is a renewed need in Ireland for a politics that transcends sectarian and narrow sectionalist demands.