secularization


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sec·u·lar·ize

 (sĕk′yə-lə-rīz′)
tr.v. sec·u·lar·ized, sec·u·lar·iz·ing, sec·u·lar·iz·es
1. To transfer from ecclesiastical or religious to civil or lay use or ownership: "The ... government ... had secularized the charitable institutions of the Church" (David I. Kertzer).
2. To draw away from religious orientation; make worldly: a society that has become secularized.
3. To lift the monastic restrictions from (a member of the clergy).

sec′u·lar·i·za′tion (-lər-ĭ-zā′shən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.secularization - the activity of changing something (art or education or society or morality etc.) so it is no longer under the control or influence of religion
change - the action of changing something; "the change of government had no impact on the economy"; "his change on abortion cost him the election"
2.secularization - transfer of property from ecclesiastical to civil possession
transference, transfer - transferring ownership
Translations

secularization

[ˌsekjʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən] Nsecularización f

secularization

nSäkularisation f; (of education, court, Sunday also)Säkularisierung f
References in periodicals archive ?
Secularization, which is mainly used to explain the relation between modernity and religion in European societies, (1) has become an indispensable concept in discussions of the recent democratic uprisings in the Muslim world.
He posits that Christian theology is the best approach to achieve this, showing how the jurisprudence of modern law is a secularization of theological concepts and that this has resulted in violence, and that a theological approach has precedent through the work of St.
My intention in this article is to contribute to the history of Catholic approaches to secularization and to suggest that the theological lens of idolatry can be a productive way to approach secularization generally and economy more particularly.
1-141) in the modern period and then dissects the debates surrounding the (in)temporality of the Caliphate in three periods: secularization in the caliphal center (1908-1916); colonization in the caliphal periphery (1916-1920); and the abolition of the Caliphate (1919-1924) (pp.
The role of not only Confucianism, but also of Christianity in East Asian modernization contradicts generally accepted secularization theories, including those by Weber and Durkheim (1).
Secularization is a complex process, as it identifies changes taking place at different levels.
In his introduction Cummings appears to waver between the position that secularization never happened and the idea that, while it happened, it is a more complicated process than has been allowed; accordingly, he seems to offer his partial history of the self alternately as an anti-secularization story and as a more complex and adequate reshaping of secularization.
Presenting a gendered model of secularization, Brown (religious and cultural history, University of Dundee) examines the secularization of society as a demographic revolution in four English-speaking countries.
Throughout Western history, the processes of secularization were linked to the legacy of the Enlightenment heritage and went hand in hand with liberalization and democratization.
In the sociological section, secularization theories provide one way to interpret declining Christian affiliation in Europe and growth in the Global South through indigenization processes, which provide the background theme present throughout all the chapters.
Summary: Pope Benedict XVI appointed Boulos Matar, the Maronite bishop of Beirut, Wednesday to the Pontifical Council for the New Evangelization, a department aimed at countering growing secularization.
This book marks an important stage in the necessary work of examining how the outpouring of gothic texts contributed to the process of secularization over the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.