secularization


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sec·u·lar·ize

 (sĕk′yə-lə-rīz′)
tr.v. sec·u·lar·ized, sec·u·lar·iz·ing, sec·u·lar·iz·es
1. To transfer from ecclesiastical or religious to civil or lay use or ownership: "The ... government ... had secularized the charitable institutions of the Church" (David I. Kertzer).
2. To draw away from religious orientation; make worldly: a society that has become secularized.
3. To lift the monastic restrictions from (a member of the clergy).

sec′u·lar·i·za′tion (-lər-ĭ-zā′shən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.secularization - the activity of changing something (art or education or society or morality etc.) so it is no longer under the control or influence of religion
change - the action of changing something; "the change of government had no impact on the economy"; "his change on abortion cost him the election"
2.secularization - transfer of property from ecclesiastical to civil possession
transference, transfer - transferring ownership
Translations

secularization

[ˌsekjʊləraɪˈzeɪʃən] Nsecularización f

secularization

nSäkularisation f; (of education, court, Sunday also)Säkularisierung f
References in periodicals archive ?
McAndrews argues that Catholic engagement with American presidents and politics challenges the conventional narrative of an increasing secularization of the political arena during the 1960s and 1970s.
My intention in this article is to contribute to the history of Catholic approaches to secularization and to suggest that the theological lens of idolatry can be a productive way to approach secularization generally and economy more particularly.
Whichever approach we use -- statistical, historical, comparative, sociological -- the secularization narrative falls apart.
In his introduction Cummings appears to waver between the position that secularization never happened and the idea that, while it happened, it is a more complicated process than has been allowed; accordingly, he seems to offer his partial history of the self alternately as an anti-secularization story and as a more complex and adequate reshaping of secularization.
With August Comte in the lead, all the important thinkers of the 19th century who have dealt with the issue of religion (such as Sigmund Freud, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim and Max Weber) firmly believed that secularization would be an inevitable consequence of modernization.
Presenting a gendered model of secularization, Brown (religious and cultural history, University of Dundee) examines the secularization of society as a demographic revolution in four English-speaking countries.
Throughout Western history, the processes of secularization were linked to the legacy of the Enlightenment heritage and went hand in hand with liberalization and democratization.
In the sociological section, secularization theories provide one way to interpret declining Christian affiliation in Europe and growth in the Global South through indigenization processes, which provide the background theme present throughout all the chapters.
Summary: Pope Benedict XVI appointed Boulos Matar, the Maronite bishop of Beirut, Wednesday to the Pontifical Council for the New Evangelization, a department aimed at countering growing secularization.
This book marks an important stage in the necessary work of examining how the outpouring of gothic texts contributed to the process of secularization over the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.
Discussions of secularization tend to diverge between two branches.
Over the last centuries, proponents of secularization have claimed that as societies modernize, the role of religion in public and private life diminishes.