sedge warbler

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sedge warbler

n
(Animals) a European songbird, Acrocephalus schoenobaenus, of reed beds and swampy areas, having a streaked brownish plumage with white eye stripes: family Muscicapidae (Old World flycatchers, etc)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sedge warbler - small European warbler that breeds among reeds and wedges and winters in Africasedge warbler - small European warbler that breeds among reeds and wedges and winters in Africa
Old World warbler, true warbler - small active brownish or greyish Old World birds
Translations
phragmite

sedge warbler

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References in classic literature ?
The song may be compared to that of the Sedge warbler, but is more powerful; some harsh notes and some very high ones, being mingled with a pleasant warbling.
2013) found Sedge Warblers (Acrocephalus schoenobaerms) had higher fuel deposition rates in native dominated control areas as compared to areas invaded with nonnative saltbush (Baccharis hamlimifolia).
Blackcaps, reed and sedge warblers appear in habitats away from their nesting areas, feasting on berries and insects before they continue their journey to Africa.
The catch that night is impressive, with two sedge warblers, a Eurasian blackcap, three willow warblers and nearly 60 swallows.
An orchestra of willow and grasshopper warblers, blackcaps, reed and garden warblers, chiffchaffs, sedge warblers and whitethroats compete for their fair share of audio coverage among all the other bird life.
The first grasshopper warblers have been seen on north Anglesey and Bardsey, but the other wetland migrants are slow to arrive, with only the Bardsey bird observatory reporting sedge warblers.
In Irish folklore, the voices of sedge warblers heard singing at
Volunteers have helped to propagate 20,000 reed seedlings to create a new, twohectare reed bed which will take several years to mature and become a home to sedge warblers, reed warblers, reed buntings and water rail.
Volunteers have helped to propagate 20,000 reed seedlings to create a new, two-hectare reed bed which will take several years to mature and become a home to sedge warblers, reed warblers, reed buntings and water rail.