constant

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con·stant

 (kŏn′stənt)
adj.
1. Continually occurring; persistent: constant surveillance. See Synonyms at continual.
2. Regularly recurring: plagued by constant interruptions.
3. Unchanging in nature, value, or extent; invariable: a constant wind speed.
4. Steadfast in purpose, loyalty, or affection; faithful. See Synonyms at faithful.
n.
1. Something that is unchanging or invariable.
2.
a. A quantity assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context.
b. An experimental or theoretical condition, factor, or quantity that does not vary or that is regarded as invariant in specified circumstances.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin cōnstāns, cōnstant-, present participle of cōnstāre, to stand firm : com-, intensive pref.; see com- + stāre, to stand; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

con′stant·ly adv.

constant

(ˈkɒnstənt)
adj
1. fixed and invariable; unchanging
2. continual or continuous; incessant: constant interruptions.
3. resolute in mind, purpose, or affection; loyal
n
4. something that is permanent or unchanging
5. (Mathematics) a specific quantity that is always invariable: the velocity of light is a constant.
6. (Mathematics)
a. maths a symbol representing an unspecified number that remains invariable throughout a particular series of operations
b. physics a theoretical or experimental quantity or property that is considered invariable throughout a particular series of calculations or experiments
7. (Logic) See logical constant
[C14: from Old French, from Latin constāns standing firm, from constāre to be steadfast, from stāre to stand]
ˈconstantly adv

Constant

(French kɔ̃stɑ̃)
n
(Biography) Benjamin (bɛ̃ʒamɛ̃). real name Henri Benjamin Constant de Rebecque. 1767–1830, French writer and politician: author of the psychological novel Adolphe (1816)

con•stant

(ˈkɒn stənt)

adj.
1. not changing; invariable: Conditions remained constant.
2. continuing without pause: constant noise.
3. regularly recurrent; continual; persistent: constant interruptions.
4. faithful; unswerving in love or devotion.
5. steadfast; firm in mind or purpose.
6. Obs. certain; confident.
n.
7. something that does not or cannot change or vary.
8. Physics. a number expressing a property, quantity, or relation that remains unchanged under specified conditions.
9. Math. a quantity assumed to be unchanged throughout a given discussion.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin constant-,constans, <constāre to stand firm]
con′stant•ly, adv.
syn: See faithful.

con·stant

(kŏn′stənt)
1. A quantity that is unknown but assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context.
2. A theoretical or experimental quantity, condition, or factor that does not vary in specified circumstances. Avogadro's number and Planck's constant are examples of constants.

constant

continualcontinuous

You can use constant, continual, and continuous to describe things that happen or exist without stopping.

1. 'constant'

You describe something as constant when it happens all the time or never goes away.

He was in constant pain.
I'm getting tired of Eva's constant criticism.
2. 'continual' and 'continuous'

Continual is usually used to describe something that happens often over a period of time. If something is continuous, it happens all the time without stopping, or seems to do so. For example, if you say 'There was continual rain', you mean that it rained often. If you say 'There was continuous rain', you mean that it did not stop raining.

Continual can only be used in front of a noun. Don't use it after a verb. Continuous can be used either in front of a noun or after a linking verb.

There have been continual demands to cut costs.
He still smoked despite the continual warnings of his nurse.
There was a continuous background noise.
Breathing should be slow and continuous.

If you are describing something undesirable which continues to happen or exist without stopping, it is better to use continual rather than continuous.

Life is a continual struggle.
She was in continual pain.
3. 'continual' or 'continuous'

If you are describing something undesirable which continues to happen or exist without stopping, it is better to use continual rather than continuous.

Life is a continual struggle.
It was sad to see her the victim of continual pain.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constant - a quantity that does not vary
quantity - the concept that something has a magnitude and can be represented in mathematical expressions by a constant or a variable
parameter, parametric quantity - a constant in the equation of a curve that can be varied to yield a family of similar curves
2.constant - a number representing a quantity assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context; "the velocity of light is a constant"
number - a concept of quantity involving zero and units; "every number has a unique position in the sequence"
Avogadro number, Avogadro's number - the number of molecules in a mole of a substance (approximately 602,250,000,000,000,000,000,000)
Boltzmann's constant - constant used in the calculation of the ideal gas constant
coefficient - a constant number that serves as a measure of some property or characteristic
cosmological constant - an arbitrary constant in the equations of general relativity theory
equilibrium constant - (chemistry) the ratio of concentrations when equilibrium is reached in a reversible reaction (when the rate of the forward reaction equals the rate of the reverse reaction)
gas constant, universal gas constant, R - (physics) the universal constant in the gas equation: pressure times volume = R times temperature; equal to 8.3143 joules per kelvin per mole
constant of gravitation, gravitational constant, universal gravitational constant, G - (physics) the universal constant relating force to mass and distance in Newton's law of gravitation
Hubble constant, Hubble parameter, Hubble's constant, Hubble's parameter - (cosmology) the ratio of the speed of recession of a galaxy (due to the expansion of the universe) to its distance from the observer; the Hubble constant is not actually a constant, but is regarded as measuring the expansion rate today
ionic charge - the charge on an ion is equal to a constant charge e multiplied by an integer from 1 to 15
constant of proportionality, factor of proportionality - the constant value of the ratio of two proportional quantities x and y; usually written y = kx, where k is the factor of proportionality
light speed, speed of light, c - the speed at which light travels in a vacuum; the constancy and universality of the speed of light is recognized by defining it to be exactly 299,792,458 meters per second
Adj.1.constant - unvarying in nature; "maintained a constant temperature"; "principles of unvarying validity"
invariable - not liable to or capable of change; "an invariable temperature"; "an invariable rule"; "his invariable courtesy"
2.constant - steadfast in purpose or devotion or affection; "a man constant in adherence to his ideals"; "a constant lover"; "constant as the northern star"
unchangeable - not changeable or subject to change; "a fixed and unchangeable part of the germ plasm"-Ashley Montagu; "the unchangeable seasons"; "one of the unchangeable facts of life"
faithful - steadfast in affection or allegiance; "years of faithful service"; "faithful employees"; "we do not doubt that England has a faithful patriot in the Lord Chancellor"
stable - resistant to change of position or condition; "a stable ladder"; "a stable peace"; "a stable relationship"; "stable prices"
invariable - not liable to or capable of change; "an invariable temperature"; "an invariable rule"; "his invariable courtesy"
inconstant - likely to change frequently often without apparent or cogent reason; variable; "inconstant affections"; "an inconstant lover"; "swear not by...the inconstant moon"- Shakespeare
3.constant - uninterrupted in time and indefinitely long continuingconstant - uninterrupted in time and indefinitely long continuing; "the ceaseless thunder of surf"; "in constant pain"; "night and day we live with the incessant noise of the city"; "the never-ending search for happiness"; "the perpetual struggle to maintain standards in a democracy"; "man's unceasing warfare with drought and isolation"; "unremitting demands of hunger"
continuous, uninterrupted - continuing in time or space without interruption; "a continuous rearrangement of electrons in the solar atoms results in the emission of light"- James Jeans; "a continuous bout of illness lasting six months"; "lived in continuous fear"; "a continuous row of warehouses"; "a continuous line has no gaps or breaks in it"; "moving midweek holidays to the nearest Monday or Friday allows uninterrupted work weeks"

constant

adjective
3. faithful, true, devoted, loyal, stalwart, staunch, dependable, trustworthy, trusty, steadfast, unfailing, tried-and-true She couldn't bear the thought of losing her constant companion.
faithful fickle, disloyal, irresolute, undependable

constant

adjective
2. Remaining continually unchanged:
4. Indicating or possessing determination, resolution, or persistence:
5. Adhering firmly and devotedly, as to a person, a cause, or a duty:
Translations
ثابِت، مُخْلِصدائِم، لا يَتَوَقَّفلا يَتَغَيَّر، ثابِتمُسْتَمِرّ
konstantaneměnnýneustálýstálývěrný
konstantstadigtro
püsiv
jatkuvavakio
konstantastalan
állandóállhatatosfolytonoskitartókonstans
stöîugurtryggur
絶えず続く
연속적인
ištikimasnekintamasnesiliaujantisnuolatinispastovumas
nelokāmsnemainīgspastāvīgsuzticīgs
nenehenstalen
konstant
ที่เกิดขึ้นตลอดเวลา
sabitsadıksüreklivefalıdeğişmez
liên tục

constant

[ˈkɒnstənt]
A. ADJ
1. (= unchanging) [temperature, velocity] → constante
to remain constantpermanecer constante
2. (= continual) [quarrels, interruptions, complaints] → constante, continuo
to be in constant useusarse continuamente
to be in constant painsufrir dolor continuamente
3. (= faithful) [friend, companion] → leal, fiel
B. N (Math, Phys) → constante f

constant

[ˈkɒnstənt] adj
(= ever-present) [threat, pressure] → constant(e), incessant(e); [reminder] → permanent(e); [state] → constant(e); [pain, fear] → permanent(e)
(= never-ending) [stream] → incessant(e); [struggle, battle] → incessant(e)
(= unfailing) [source] → constant(e); [supply, flow] → constant(e)
(= unbroken) [contact] → permanent(e)
[companion] → de tous les instants

constant

adj
(= continuous) quarrels, interruptions, noisedauernd, ständig, konstant (geh); we have constant hot waterwir haben ständig heißes Wasser
(= unchanging) temperaturegleichmäßig, gleichbleibend, konstant; x remains constant while y …x bleibt konstant, während y …; the price is not constantder Preis bleibt nicht gleich or konstant
(= steadfast) affection, devotionunwandelbar, beständig; friend, supporter, lovertreu
n (Math, Phys, fig) → Konstante f, → konstante Größe

constant

[ˈkɒnstnt]
1. adj (interruptions) → continuo/a, incessante; (use) → continuo/a, costante; (speed, temperature, rhythm) → costante; (affection) → costante, stabile; (friend, love) → fedele
2. n (Math, Phys) → costante f

constant

(ˈkonstənt) adjective
1. never stopping. a constant noise.
2. unchanging. It must be kept at a constant temperature.
3. faithful. He remained constant.
ˈconstantly adverb
ˈconstancy noun

constant

مُسْتَمِرّ neustálý konstant ständig συνεχής constante jatkuva constant stalan costante 絶えず続く 연속적인 constant vedvarende stały constante постоянный konstant ที่เกิดขึ้นตลอดเวลา sabit liên tục 不断的

con·stant

a. constante, persistente.

constant

adj constante