sedition

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se·di·tion

 (sĭ-dĭsh′ən)
n.
1. Conduct or language inciting rebellion against the authority of a state.
2. Archaic Insurrection; rebellion.

[Middle English sedicioun, violent party strife, from Old French sedition, from Latin sēditiō, sēditiōn- : sēd-, sē-, apart; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots + itiō, act of going (from itus, past participle of īre, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots).]

se·di′tion·ist n.

sedition

(sɪˈdɪʃən)
n
1. speech or behaviour directed against the peace of a state
2. (Law) an offence that tends to undermine the authority of a state
3. (Law) an incitement to public disorder
4. archaic revolt
[C14: from Latin sēditiō discord, from sēd- apart + itiō a going, from īre to go]
seˈditionary n, adj

se•di•tion

(sɪˈdɪʃ ən)

n.
1. incitement of discontent or rebellion against a government.
2. any action promoting such discontent or rebellion.
[1325–75; Middle English sedicioun (< Anglo-French) < Latin sēditiō=sēd- se- + -i-, variant s. of īre to go + -tiō -tion]
syn: See treason.

sedition

Willfully advocating or teaching the duty or necessity of overthrowing the US government or any political subdivision by force or violence. See also counterintelligence.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sedition - an illegal action inciting resistance to lawful authority and tending to cause the disruption or overthrow of the government
infraction, misdemeanor, misdemeanour, violation, infringement - a crime less serious than a felony
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

sedition

noun rabble-rousing, treason, subversion, agitation, disloyalty, incitement to riot Government officials charged him with sedition.

sedition

noun
1. Organized opposition intended to change or overthrow existing authority:
2. Willful violation of allegiance to one's country:
Translations

sedition

[səˈdɪʃən] Nsedición f

sedition

[sɪˈdɪʃən] nsédition f

sedition

nAufwiegelung f, → Verhetzung f

sedition

[səˈdɪʃn] nsedizione f
References in classic literature ?
Upon the whole, the consequences of such a law as this would be directly contrary to those things which good laws ought to establish, and which Socrates endeavoured to establish by his regulations concerning women and children: for we think that friendship is the greatest good which can happen to any city, as nothing so much prevents seditions: and amity in a city is what Socrates commends above all things, which appears to be, as indeed he says, the effect of friendship; as we learn from Aristophanes in the Erotics, who says, that those who love one another from the excess of that passion, desire to breathe the same soul, and from being two to be blended into one: from whence it would necessarily follow, that both or one of them must be destroyed.
But for democracies, they need it not; and they are commonly more quiet, and less subject to sedition, than where there are stirps of nobles.
By a judicious use of this Law of Nature, the Polygons and Circles are almost always able to stifle sedition in its very cradle, taking advantage of the irrepressible and boundless hopefulness of the human mind.