seed coat


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seed coat

n.
The outer protective covering of a seed.

seed coat

n
(Botany) the nontechnical name for testa

seed′ coat`


n.
the outer covering of a seed.
[1790–1800]

seed coat

The outer protective covering of a seed. Also called testa.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seed coat - protective outer layer of seeds of flowering plantsseed coat - protective outer layer of seeds of flowering plants
reproductive structure - the parts of a plant involved in its reproduction
seed - a mature fertilized plant ovule consisting of an embryo and its food source and having a protective coat or testa
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers working in bioscience and biotechnology, crop research, agriculture, chemistry, entomology, and other fields around the world address such topics as the influence of the soybean seed coat upon seed infestation; the effects of soil texture and salinity on the plant-water relationship; water balance components of the soybean canopy; the characterization of soybean cultivars, and their performance in Southern Africa; the presence of deoxynivalenol in soybeans in Serbia; blight and contamination; and wheat growth for alcohol, in Bangladesh, and its composition and feeding value for poultry.
The pair noticed that the nanotubes appear to penetrate the thick seed coat, which would allow water to enter the dry seeds more rapidly.
Scarification is the process of breaking or reducing the seed coat so that moisture can penetrate the embryo, which can then begin to germinate.
Seed can either be pre-soaked in tepid water for a few hours before sowing to soften the hard seed coat or the seed coat can be nicked with a sharp pointed knife to let water in.
In day-to-day roasting operations, removable side panels and seed coat bins ease cleaning considerably.
A ADRIENNE SAYS: Sweet peas have a hard seed coat so soak them in tepid water overnight to encourage germination.
Khosh-Khui and Bassiri (1976) found that hard seed coat was the principal cause for poor seed germination of myrtle's seed, and scarification with cold acid for 60 min at 20[degrees]C was the best treatment for removing dormancy.
This prevents good fibre from being ejected with leaf, stick and stem particles, seed coat fragments and other waste that must be removed.
Its fruits are 4-12 cm long legumes with papery pubescent valves that contain 1-9 seeds having a thick, hard seed coat.
Further, seed coat pigmentation occurs only in yellow hilum cultivars and is absent in cultivars with brown hilum (Sunada and Ito, 1982; Takahashi, 1997).