seed oyster


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seed oyster

n.
A young oyster, especially one suitable for transplanting to another bed.

seed oyster

n
(Animals) a young oyster, esp a cultivated oyster, ready for transplantation

seed′ oy`ster


n.
a very young oyster, esp. one suitable for transplanting to start an oyster bed.
[1880–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seed oyster - a young oyster especially of a size for transplantationseed oyster - a young oyster especially of a size for transplantation
oyster - marine mollusks having a rough irregular shell; found on the sea bed mostly in coastal waters
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References in periodicals archive ?
Reef structure In the summer, there were no differences in the volume of loose shells, shell clusters, vertical relief, total oyster density, seed oyster density, or mussel density (Table 1).
The sole railer in the race, Woodbrook Becks has the added benefit of having exwide seed Oyster Flight in trap two and appears assured of a solo.
In our field studies, higher seed oyster mortalities were observed in open cages compared with closed cages at MP and BG and were likely due to predation from blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus), stone crabs (Menippe adina), and black drums (Pogonias cromis) as evidenced by occasional crab, drum, and shell fragments in open cages lifted out of water during sampling (Fig.
Seed grounds have been managed primarily for seed oyster production, but oysters at least 3 inches (7.
The former is a direct product of seed oyster planting whereas the latter originates in both the initial shell deployment and, in areas A and D, shell overlay.
Leases were purchased from private individuals to provide a state seed oyster reservation in Sister Lake, watchmen were hired, and housing facilities were secured.
Haplosporidium nelsoni (MSX) on Delaware Bay seed oyster beds a host-parasite relationship along a salinity gradient.
Also in 1965, efforts were made to control blue mussel beds which had spread to and destroyed certain softshell clam flats; and the Department contracted with the University of New Hampshire to study the soft-shell clam population in Hampton-Seabrook Harbor and the possibility of seed oyster production in Great Bay.
Harvest in the Piankatank River is limited to a well-regulated seed oyster fishery that has been executed for in excess of 25 y, and for which long-term monitoring of both oyster recruitment (reviewed in Southworth and Mann (2004, 2013)) and disease (both Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni) (e.