seediness


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seed·y

 (sē′dē)
adj. seed·i·er, seed·i·est
1. Having many seeds.
2. Resembling seeds or a seed.
3. Worn and shabby; unkempt: "He was soiled and seedy and fragrant with gin" (Mark Twain).
4. Somewhat disreputable; squalid: a seedy hotel in a run-down neighborhood.
5. Chiefly British Tired or sick; unwell.

seed′i·ly adv.
seed′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seediness - a lack of elegance as a consequence of wearing threadbare or dirty clothingseediness - a lack of elegance as a consequence of wearing threadbare or dirty clothing
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste
raggedness - shabbiness by virtue of being in rags
Translations
ošumělost
lurvethed
betegességmagvasság
e-î sem er í niîurníîslu
ošarpanosťschátranosť
köhnelikrahatsızlık

seediness

[ˈsiːdɪnɪs] N (= shabbiness) [of hotel, nightclub] → sordidez f, cutrez f (Sp) ; [of clothes] → lo raído, cutrez f (Sp) ; [of person] → pinta f desastrada

seediness

[ˈsiːdinɪs] n (= shabbiness) → aspect m miteux

seediness

n (= disreputableness)Zwielichtigkeit f

seed

(siːd) noun
1. the (part of) the fruit of a tree, plant etc from which a new plant may be grown. sunflower seeds; grass seed.
2. the beginning from which anything grows. There was already a seed of doubt in her mind.
3. (in a sporting competition etc) a seeded player.
verb
1. (of a plant) to produce seed. A plant seeds after it has flowered.
2. in golf, tennis etc, to arrange (good players) in a competition so that they do not compete against each other till the later rounds.
ˈseeded adjective
having been seeded. a seeded player.
ˈseedling (-liŋ) noun
a young plant just grown from a seed. Don't walk on the lettuce seedlings!
ˈseedy adjective
1. shabby. a rather seedy hotel.
2. ill or unhealthy. He's feeling a bit seedy.
ˈseediness noun
ˈseedbed noun
ground prepared for growing seeds.
go to seed
1. (of a person) to become careless about one's clothes and appearance. Don't let yourself go to seed when you reach middle age!
2. (of a place) to become rather shabby and uncared for. This part of town has gone to seed recently.
3. (also run to seed) (of a plant) to produce seeds after flowering.
References in classic literature ?
As he stood there, gazing into the middle distance, an individual of dishevelled aspect sidled up, a vagrant of almost the maximum seediness, from whose midriff there protruded a trayful of a strange welter of collar-studs, shoe-laces, rubber rings, buttonhooks, and dying roosters.
A casual visitor might suppose this place to be a temple dedicated to the Genius of Seediness.
Like modern midtown Manhattan, The Deuce's version of '70s seediness seems a bit too sanitized to reveal what was really interesting about the way things used to be.
As well as Sky Lounge and Issho, there's Belgrave Music Hall in the Northern Quarter, a hipster area where seediness vies with new investment to create a district on the rise.
Maybe the line of lovers might've lengthened, seediness tarnishing her halo as the years advanced.
One of the most noticeable results of Giuliani's work was in turning Times Square, a place previously known for seediness and urban decay, where people feared going after dark, into a thriving, family-friendly tourist hot spot.
Rotten, real name Lydon, said he spoke out in 1978 in an interview with Radio 1, in which he called Savile a "hypocrite, into all kinds of seediness we're not allowed to talk about".
John Simm steals the show as the creepily controlling Lenny, constantly ignoring his fantasist father Max, played with perfect seediness by Ron Cook.
Lydon, better known as Johnny Rotten, has referred to an interview he did back in 1978, in which he commented that Savile was "into all sorts of seediness.