seemliness


Also found in: Thesaurus.

seem·ly

 (sēm′lē)
adj. seem·li·er, seem·li·est
1. Conforming to standards of conduct and good taste; suitable: seemly behavior.
2. Of pleasing appearance; handsome.
adv.
In a seemly manner; suitably.

[Middle English semely, from Old Norse sœmiligr, from sœmr, fitting; see sem- in Indo-European roots.]

seem′li·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seemliness - a sense of propriety and consideration for others; "a place where the company of others must be accepted with good grace"
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
unseemliness - a lack of consideration for others

seemliness

noun
Conformity to recognized standards, as of conduct or appearance:
Translations

seemliness

[ˈsiːmlɪnɪs] N (frm) → decoro m, decencia f

seemliness

References in classic literature ?
Her black dress, simple to austerity, suggested her bereaved condition, and I was innocently astonished that notwithstanding a real emotion she was able to dress the part she had to play according to her notions of seemliness.
He was always so anxious to find seemliness, happiness, and peace in everything, and I should have been proud to let him see us.
Opinion will doubtless vary as to the quality and seemliness of the sexual sparks flying between the two stars, fueled by daughter issues(!) on his side and daddy worship on hers.
Under the successive masterships of Matthew Wren (1625-34) and John Cosin (1635-45), Peterhouse observed an advanced ceremonial in its worship that fully reflected Laud's desire for seemliness and beauty.
Once the question that haunts post-mythic consciousness--that of the seemliness of religious symbols--had been asked, the ancient texts were, in their pristine form, no longer acceptable.
When the time is right, Thailand should move further away from one and closer to the other as realities and diplomatic seemliness dictate.
Bresson, fascinated by Lancelot's internal struggle, creates a man not unlike that described by Malory: "[God] hath given you beauty, seemliness, and great strength above all other knights" (686).
He described Shakespeare's genius as "full of strength and fertility, of the natural and the sublime, without the least spark of good taste, and without the least knowledge of the rules [of theater]." (3) A writer brought up not to mix the tragic and the comic in the same play, to respect the importance of bienseance (decorum, seemliness), Voltaire was especially shocked by Desdemona's being strangled onstage, and by the gravediggers' scene in Hamlet.
"By paying attention to the small things," writes Mills, "the wholesomeness of daily bread, the source and state of the water, the seemliness of one's shelter, and the well-being of all the human and more-than-human lives around us--we may be led to practice simplicity and harmlessness in tangible ways."
The assembled works of art provide the excuse to fight some contemporary ideological battles: battles about the place of sexuality in public life, the ideals of modesty and seemliness, the concept of sexual normality.
This emphasis involves counsel staffers in a range of activities, including distinguishing between White House expenses and campaign expenses; reviewing presidential travel; approving requests for appointments with the president and monitoring the requests for propriety, seemliness, legality, and executive privilege issues; responding to document requests and subpoenas directed to the president and to other White House and executive branch officials by congressional committees and independent counsels; and serving as the ethics officers for White House staff and executive branch political appointees.
With this Administration, which I have begun to think of more as a murder-suicide pact with the citizenry, all bets are off on the seemliness scale.