segregationist


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seg·re·ga·tion·ist

 (sĕg′rĭ-gā′shə-nĭst)
n.
One that advocates or practices a policy of racial segregation.

seg′re·ga′tion·ist adj.

segregationist

(ˌsɛɡrɪˈɡeɪʃənɪst)
n
(Sociology) a person who favours, advocates, or practises racial segregation

seg•re•ga•tion•ist

(ˌsɛg rɪˈgeɪ ʃə nɪst)

n.
a person who advocates segregation, esp. racial segregation.
[1910–15]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.segregationist - someone who believes the races should be kept apart
bigot - a prejudiced person who is intolerant of any opinions differing from his own
Translations

segregationist

[ˌsegrɪˈgeɪʃnɪst] Nsegregacionista mf

segregationist

nBefürworter(in) m(f)der Rassentrennung

segregationist

[ˈsɛgrɪˈgeɪʃnɪst] adj & nsegregazionista (m/f)
References in periodicals archive ?
He cites the role played by segregationist editors: "It was fascinating to see how they felt they had something very important to defend.
corporations to cease doing business in apartheid South Africa, and the campaign helped bring down the country's segregationist government.
But Mr Wallace mellowed with age and later renounced his segregationist views, preaching racial equality and winning the votes of blacks he had once fought to keep disenfranchised.
This study effectively utilizes memoirs, autobiographies, manuscript collections, and other primary and secondary sources to tell its story, which supplements other works on movement leaders and followers and on the segregationist opposition.
The story brought national attention to a segregationist policy that had been fought by several individuals.
In this latest study, Desmond King joins that discussion, providing unprecedented insight into some of the Gilded Age's most crucial pieces of legislation, and demonstrates critical links between America's policy toward external European immigrants and the internal segregationist and racist status quo, suggesting that the same attitudes and behaviors that shaped resentment and restriction of immigrants in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries also substantiated Jim Crow and Asian exclusion acts.
Does this mean President Bush shares Lott's segregationist views by refusing to ask for his resignation?
Indeed, the advent of the automobile in the 1920s threatened much of the segregationist order, leading many cities and towns to attempt to impose "racial rights-of-way" at intersections and on lanes.
Willis Robertson, a conservative Democrat who was part of Virginia's staunchly segregationist political establishment.
These two overlapping networks grew out of the failed segregationist movement of the 1950s and 1960s.
Fishkin's book succeeds - most amazingly - in the persuasive brevity with which it pins down the case for adding black voices to reading lists still shaped by an "American criticism" that, even today, "remains both segregationist and racist.