seismogram


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seis·mo·gram

 (sīz′mə-grăm′)
n.
The record of an earth tremor made by a seismograph.

seis•mo•gram

(ˈsaɪz məˌgræm, ˈsaɪs-)

n.
a record made by a seismograph.
[1890–95]

seismogram

the record of an earthquake’s vibrations and intensity made by a seismograph.
See also: Earthquakes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.seismogram - the graphical record of an earth tremor made by using a seismograph
graph, graphical record - a visual representation of the relations between certain quantities plotted with reference to a set of axes
References in periodicals archive ?
The cut-off frequency was chosen empirically considering the signal power and amplitude in the frequency domain and maximising the correlation coefficient between seismogram and GPSgram.
"We're throwing away the first three hours of the seismogram and what we're looking at is between three and 10 hours after a large earthquake happens.
This eruption is recorded on a seismogram with maximum amplitude of 27 millimeters and duration of 31 seconds,' PVMBG wrote as quoted by VIVA on the Geology Agency's official website, Friday (8/24).
Moreira (1991a) using a duration formula and just the seismogram from Hohenheim (seismic station located in Stuttgart) calculated M = 6.7.
Later to confirm our calculated DT log, a synthetic seismogram is generated using calculated DT log and density log (RHOB).
A seismogram recorded at Llynfaes on the Wednesday showed minor seismic activity at 1.05pm, but this does not account for noises reported later in the week.
Seismic refraction was carried out in the study area, using a 24-Channel ABEM Terraloc Mark 6 seismogram [2].
Richard Hoyle, a student reading geological science at the University of Leicester, said: "A few days after we installed the equipment at the school and were analysing data collected, we noticed large peaks on the seismogram during football matches being held in the stadium nearby.
Richard Hoyle, a first-year student from Leeds studying geological science at the University of Leicester, said: "A few days after we installed the equipment at the school and were analysing data collected, we noticed large peaks on the seismogram during football matches being held in the stadium nearby.
University of Leicester first year student Richard Hoyle said: "We noticed large peaks on the seismogram during matches.
An increase of one unit of magnitude, for example, from a 4.0 to a 5.0 quake, is a 10-fold increase in wave amplitude on a seismogram, or about a 30-fold increase in energy released.
In a seismogram the attenuation is represented by the amplitude reduction, caused by geometric spreading, intrinsic attenuation due to the medium anelasticity, scattering associated with the inhomogeneities, among other factors.