selectionist

se·lec·tion·ist

 (sĭ-lĕk′shə-nĭst)
n.
One who believes that evolution occurs chiefly as a result of natural selection.

se·lec′tion·ism n.
se·lec′tion·ist adj.

selectionist

(sɪˈlɛkʃənɪst)
n
(Philosophy) a person who believes in natural selection
adj
(Biology) of or relating to the belief in natural selection
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditional cognitivists do not accept such a selectionist standpoint.
This article attempts to answer these questions through a rigorous selectionist view relating to brain development and the evolutionary integration of these structures and functions of kinesthetic intelligence.
From blind to creative: In defense of Donald Campbell's selectionist theory of human creativity.
Current mainstream accounts of cultural behavior are strongly founded on a selectionist perspective.
Reed 1993 "Population aggregation in the prehistoric American Southwest: a selectionist model", American Antiquity, 58(4):648-661.
Bergson's 'Matter and Memory' and Modern Selectionist Theories of Memory.
there is a blatant contradiction between an exclusively selectionist explanation of mind, on the one hand, and the implicit trust you place in your own mind's capacity to arrive at the naked truth, on the other.
A selectionist account of language learning suggests that only some responses of infants to specific stimuli will produce desired consequences.
This so-called neo-Darwinian synthesis was selectionist, to be sure, but it did not exclusively rely on random genetic variation of the kind that this book decries as unable to fully account for evolution.
Wallace had been a more ardent selectionist than Darwin, yet here he is requiring some other force beyond selection to account for our brains, adding a too-familiar refrain: ".
9) CST appeared in the context of competing ideas of antibody formation, between those favoring instructionist and those favoring selectionist models for the origin of antibody specificities.