selenography

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sel·e·nog·ra·phy

 (sĕl′ə-nŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The study of the physical features of the moon.

sel′e·nog′ra·pher, sel′e·nog′ra·phist n.
sel′e·no·graph′ic (-nə-grăf′ĭk), sel′e·no·graph′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

selenography

(ˌsiːlɪˈnɒɡrəfɪ)
n
(Astronomy) the branch of astronomy concerned with the description and mapping of the surface features of the moon
selenograph n
ˌseleˈnographer, ˌseleˈnographist n
selenographic, seˌlenoˈgraphical adj
seˌlenoˈgraphically adv

selenography

the branch of astronomy that deals with the charting of the moon’s surface. — selenographer, selenographist, n. — selenographic, selenographical, adj.
See also: Moon
the scientific analysis and mapping of the moon’s physical features. — selenographer, selenographist, n.selenographic, selenographical, adj.
See also: Astronomy

selenography

The study and mapping of the surface of the moon.
Translations
Selenografie
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Selenographers are not agreed upon the nature of these colors.
A list of the most prominent German selenographers would include Tobias Mayer, Johannes Schroter, Wilhelm Lohrmann, Beer & Madler, Julius Schmidt, Johann Krieger, and Philip Fauth; but it is certainly the case that by the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the most significant contributions were also being made by British amateurs and by the BAA Lunar Section.
At that time intense competition among selenographers (Moon mappers) led them to make maps and to win favor from local kings and nobles by using their names for features.
The photographs taken by Russian sputniks and American Ranger missions in the '60s placed a premium on accuracy; the estheticizing idealism of solitary 19th-century selenographers had been replaced by the scientificity of highly trained specialists in the service of government agencies.
The dark surface of Plato had long been the focus of selenographers' attention since Hevelius brought his telescope to bear on the lunar surface and christened the feature the 'Greater black lake'.
Some early selenographers considered Reiner Gamma to be an old, degraded crater with a dark center and unusually bright rim.
This perhaps explains why until confronted by their oversight in 1954, selenographers in general were apparently unaware of a statement made in 1868 which diminished the impact of J.
Lamont has always puzzled selenographers. Its round outline implies some kind of relationship to normal impact craters, but there is little else craterlike about it.
The matter might well have been concluded on this note, however the shadow of unreliability cast over Schroter's work led a number of selenographers to seek the truth of his 'Alhazen'.
Classic selenographers assumed that the fill was lava but didn't seem to notice that the maria (where most lunar lava is found) are much darker than Wargentin.
Richard Baum's fine paper has pointed the way, and it is to be hoped that in the near future others will be able to undertake the fuller cataloguing and analysis of the lifetime's work of one of the last of the great British selenographers.
The plateau itself was almost completely ignored by classical selenographers, who were dazzled by Aristarchus and fascinated by Schroter's Valley.