self-


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self-

pref.
1. Oneself; itself: self-control.
2. Automatic; automatically: self-loading.

[Middle English, from Old English, from self, self; see self.]

self-

combining form
1. of oneself or itself: self-defence; self-rule.
2. by, to, in, due to, for, or from the self: self-employed; self-inflicted; self-respect.
3. automatic or automatically: self-propelled.

self

(sɛlf)

n.andpron., pl. selves,
adj. n.
1. a person or thing referred to with respect to complete individuality: one's own self.
2. a person's nature, character, etc.: his better self.
3. personal interest.
4. Philos. the subject of experience as contrasted with the object of experience; ego.
5. any of the natural constituents of the body that are normally not subject to attack by components of the immune system.
pron.
6. myself, herself, etc.: to make a check payable to self.
adj.
7. being the same throughout; uniform.
8. being of one piece with or the same material as the rest.
9. Obs. same.
[before 900; Old English self, selfa, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon self, Old High German selb, Old Norse sjalfr, Gothic silba]

self-

a combining form of self, appearing in various parts of speech, usu. with the implied notion that the agent and object or recipient of a given transitive predicate are identical (self-control; self-government; self-help; self-portrait), or that the subject of a given predicate acts or is effective without assistance (self-adhesive; self-loading; self-study).
Translations

self-

[self] PREFIXauto..., ... de sí mismo

self-

[ˈsɛlf-] prefix
(relating to oneself)auto-, auto
(doing sth automatically)auto-
a self-regulating mechanism → un mécanisme auto-régulateur

self-

[sɛlf] prefauto...

self-

(self)
1. showing that the person or thing acting is acting upon himself or itself, as in self-respect.
2. showing that the thing is acting automatically, as in self-closing doors.
3. by oneself, as in self-made.
4. in, within etc oneself or itself, as in self-centred.
References in classic literature ?
And so the reliance on Property, including the reliance on governments which protect it, is the want of self- reliance.
But then, again, my exasperating insight into Alfred's self- complacent soul, his freedom from all the doubts and fears, the unsatisfied yearnings, the exquisite tortures of sensitiveness, that had made the web of my life, seemed to absolve me from all bonds towards him.
It was hypothesized that: there is a positive relationship between self-esteem and collective self- esteem; there is negative relationship between collective self-esteem and depression; lack of self esteem and collective self-esteem are predictors of depression.