self-assertion

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Related to self-assertively: nonassertive

self-as·ser·tion

(sĕlf′ə-sûr′shən)
n.
Determined advancement of one's own personality, wishes, or views.

self′-as·ser′tive adj.
self′-as·ser′tive·ly adv.
self-as·ser′tive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

self-assertion

n
the act or an instance of putting forward one's own opinions, etc, esp in an aggressive or conceited manner
ˌself-asˈserting adj
ˌself-asˈsertingly adv
ˌself-asˈsertive adj
ˌself-asˈsertively adv
ˌself-asˈsertiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

self′-asser′tion



n.
insistence on or an expression of one's own importance, opinions, or the like.
[1795–1805]
self′-asser′tive, adj.
self′-asser′tively, adv.
self′-asser′tiveness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.self-assertion - the act of putting forth your own opinions in a boastful or inconsiderate manner that implies you feel superior to others
boast, boasting, jactitation, self-praise - speaking of yourself in superlatives
2.self-assertion - the act of asserting yourself in an aggressive manner
aggression - deliberately unfriendly behavior
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

self-assertion

[ˌselfəˈsɜːʃən] Nasertividad f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout the chapters, Dunbar-Hester methodically highlights the gender politics surrounding a group like Prometheus, which was self-assertively geeky and aggressively activist, not to mention demographically male-dominated.
More importantly, Dilman's argument relies heavily on the opposition between believing something "philosophically" and "self-assertively" (his 90d is actually 91a2-3).