self-concept


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self-con·cept

(sĕlf′kŏn′sĕpt)
n.
The mental image or perception that one has of oneself.

self-concept

n
(Psychology) psychol the whole set of attitudes, opinions, and cognitions that a person has of himself
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The findings of the study suggest that youths with psychiatric disorders, currently receiving inpatient services, reported lower self-concept, particularly global self-worth, compared to those receiving outpatient services.
The study from the University of Waterloo found that youth with psychiatric disorders currently receiving inpatient services reported lower self-concept, particularly global self-worth, compared to those receiving outpatient services.
Researchers found that youths receiving inpatient help had poorer self-concept than those getting help on an outpatient basis, based on an analysis of the self-perceptions of a few dozen adolescents between ages 8 and 17.
Studies have made note of the association between one's perceived academic ability and belonging, known as academic self-concept, and academic success (Johnson, 2005; Pittman & Richmond, 2008).
Accordingly, prior empirical evidence in foreign and Spanish populations clearly underlines the existing relationship between self-concept and social acceptance (e.
Mathematics Self-concept scale by Marsh (1948) was used to know students' academic self-concept.
Raghwan and Archna Dogra, Self-concept scale by Saraswat (1997).
Self-awareness and self-understanding emerge over time and a child's ability to evaluate his or her competencies against those of others contributes to the child's emerging self-concept (Rochat, 2003).
what representational mechanism do we deploy to refer to ourselves through it (2) How does the proposed semantics help solve some open philosophical issues concerning the self-concept These include issues (2a) in epistemology; (2b) in the metaphysics of persons and moral philosophy.
An adolescent's potential to solve problems, knowledge of moral codes and social norms, and growing consciousness towards adulthood all play very important role in the development of self-concept (Burns, 1979).
Teacher self-concept has been shown to be a significant predictor for the implementation of new instructional practices (Guskey, 1988), symptoms of burnout (Friedman & Farber, 1992; Villa & Calvete, 2001), resistance to stress (Flughes, 1987), sense of personal accomplishment (Hughes, 1987), and even students' cognitive growth (Aspy & Buhler, 1975).
This study examines the impact of academic failure on the self-concept of the students.