self-consciously


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self-con·scious

(sĕlf′kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1. Aware of oneself as an individual or of one's own being, actions, or thoughts.
2. Socially ill at ease: The self-conscious teenager sat alone during lunch.
3. Excessively conscious of one's appearance or manner: The self-conscious actor kept fixing his hair.
4. Showing the effects of self-consciousness; stilted: self-conscious prose.

self′-con′scious·ly adv.
self′-con′scious·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.self-consciously - in an uncomfortably self-conscious manner; "the little girl self-consciously recited the poem"
unselfconsciously - in a comfortable unselfconscious manner; "they were naked, unshy, and unselfconsciously beautiful"
Translations

self-consciously

[ˌselfˈkɒnʃəslɪ] ADVcohibidamente, tímidamente

self-conscious

(selfˈkonʃəs) adjective
too easily becoming shy or embarrassed when in the presence of others. She'll never be a good teacher – she's too self-conscious.
ˈself-ˈconsciously adverb
ˌself-ˈconsciousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Porthos looked over his shoulder very self-consciously, and the rabbit at first slowly and then in a flash withdrew.
Peter tried hard not to look too self-consciously delighted.
said I, self-consciously, for I began to see that this was what he did mean.
They did not like to be included in the same lot, but they both smiled a little self-consciously, and Arthur and Terence glanced at each other too.
Even if the songs are agreeably and suitably inspirational, the lyrics are couched in language that's too verbose and self-consciously 'serious' to make the grade as a song for child performers.
Admittedly, sometimes it feels almost self-consciously odd, but better that than dull.
It is written a bit self-consciously about the authors own cat.
Most of interest is a 55-minute TV special in which Agnetha, Benny, Bjorn and Anni-Frid, dressed in the primary colour costumes of the day, self-consciously introduce their hits.
This is because Channel 4 is self-consciously edgy.
However, the film's domestic lunacy is too forced, too self-consciously weird and too full-on to be funny for two-hours.
While it may be too self-consciously hip (and commercial) for some, the ad-supported IdealBite.
However, it's hard not to feel resigned when subjected to this film's lame, self-consciously knowing approach to American history--as when Martin Sheen chides Helen Hunt for "buying a painting of a soup can" or when a campaign volunteer makes sure to end his superfluous explanation of how to fill out a ballot with a "prescient" beat about chads.