self-controlled


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self-con·trol

(sĕlf′kən-trōl′)
n.
Control of one's emotions, desires, or actions by one's own will.

self′-con·trolled′ adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

self-controlled

adjective
Tending to keep one's thoughts and emotions to oneself:
Translations

self-controlled

[ˌselfkənˈtrəʊld] ADJsereno
she's very self-controlledtiene mucho autocontrol

self-controlled

[ˌsɛlfkənˈtrəʊld] adjpadrone/a di sé
References in periodicals archive ?
The increase of emotional self-control skills through the use of exergames inside the campus should certainly be a positive option, especially because self-controlled students have higher correlations with higher scores, showing that low self-control is thus a significant risk factor for a broad range of personal and interpersonal problems in college student's context [50].
The team used the self-controlled case series method with the main risk period for a first diagnosis of VTE set at 1-42 days after vaccination.
Data source: The findings are based on a self-controlled case series analysis of 4,375 Danish women from a population cohort of 1.
17) Aesthetics, which is the science about what is admirably in it self, identifies the ideal, which the ethical action ought to follow; the means to reach the goal belongs to logic, which deals with self-controlled reasoning.
Specifically, Wouters shows how informalization involves more self-control than the seemingly self-controlled Victorians.
Paul Gilmore has argued that eastern American theater, far away from the western frontier of expansion, presented Indian masculinity as a direct and attractively exoticized contrast to the increasing emphasis on self-controlled white manhood, producing "blacks and Indians simultaneously as primitive embodiments of unruly masculine behavior and as safe, sentimentalized commodities for a feminist middle-class audience.
We are to live lives that are self-controlled, upright, and godly.
In Fellman's writing, the self-contained, self-controlled leader of legend is an inwardly tortured man, burdened by his born-again Christian beliefs and the Stoic principles he derived from a constant reading of Marcus Aurelius.
It is Mele's contention that even an optimally self-controlled agent could fall short of autonomy.
Referred subjects, for example, were rated significantly less self-controlled than nonreferred, matched partners.
Though there was a certain nobility proposed for human beings in their being just, courageous, and self-controlled, the ultimate purpose of this was not to please God but to rejoice in one's own good qualities.
95--Mele questions whether being a self-controlled person is also sufficient for personal autonomy.