self-correcting

(redirected from self-correct)
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self-cor·rect·ing

(sĕlf′kə-rĕk′tĭng)
adj.
1. Correcting its or one's own mistakes.
2. Of or being a typewriter mechanism that allows for automatic correction of a typing error.

self′-cor·rec′tive adj.

self-correcting

adj
capable of correcting itself without external aid
Translations

self-correcting

[ˌselfkəˈrektɪŋ] ADJautocorrector
References in periodicals archive ?
The Baltoro HF uses automated intelligence to optimize and maintain color and image quality as well as self-correct in real-time.
There are a couple of times when we can see her perform a truncated gesture when her left-hand rises towards her bump in a bid to cradle it, but she appears to self-correct and drop her hand down to her side instead," she explained.
Such unresponsiveness by the authorities to complaints has led to citizens losing faith in police mechanisms to self-correct itself and abide by the constitutional Bill of Rights and international best practices contained in treaties that Kenya has ratified.Elvis Salano, via email.
Each organizational project represents a moment of potential transformation, and each success helps a firm self-correct and become what it needs to be to survive: a malleable organization capable of capturing new opportunities.
The sponsor has two years from the calendar year in which the problem began to self-correct. After that, it must seek the IRS' help, via the VCP, to work out a correction strategy.
It seems as if we will never stop being amazed by the human body's incredible capacity to self-correct and self-repair.
Remarking on the figures, Sidharth Mehta, partner and head of building, construction, and real estate at KPMG Lower Gulf, said: "While oil prices remain well below the long term average, which is clearly having an effect on market confidence, Dubai's improved regulatory environment, broader investor profile, and increased maturity are all indicators that its real estate market should eventually self-correct.
Luckily, says Ellis, "There is still time for these entities to self-correct."
Specifically, playing dumb allows your conversational partner time to self-correct (e.g., "That's not what I meant" or "I can't believe I just said that; sorry") after an ill-conceived statement.
According to an IRS Learn, Educate, Self-Correct and Enforce (LESE) project, which examines a random selection of approximately 50 returns to study common compliance issues, in about 10% of the plans examined, corrective distributions were not properly made.
Our existing processes had offered us but one glimpse into a candidate's abilities to build rapport with children and self-correct. This glimpse came during and after a demonstration lesson.