self-deceit


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self-de·ceit

(sĕlf′dĭ-sēt′)
n.
Self-deception.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.self-deceit - a misconception that is favorable to the person who holds it
misconception - an incorrect conception
References in classic literature ?
"I will soon explain to what these feelings tended, but allow me now to return to the cottagers, whose story excited in me such various feelings of indignation, delight, and wonder, but which all terminated in additional love and reverence for my protectors(for so I loved, in an innocent, half-painful self-deceit, to call them)."
Whatever gloss the various spectators put upon the interest, according to their several arts and powers of self-deceit, the interest was, at the root of it, Ogreish.
Grant, really eager to get any change for her sister, could, by the easiest self-deceit, persuade herself that she was doing the kindest thing by Fanny, and giving her the most important opportunities of improvement in pressing her frequent calls.
It is an exercise in self-deceit for those pretending to install and for those purportedly installed.
This self-deceit continues as men, women, and kids are blinded by the unrestrained use of pellet guns.
bent to the business of self-deceit, or futures ground from old salt.
Instead Lewis posits that Hamlet is a 'thinker of unrelenting superficiality, confusion, and pious self-deceit' (p.
Israel is complex and thrives in self-deceit. It hoodwinks itself to believing that its neighbours are primitive, and uncivilized.
It is very easy to deceive people and get away with the deceit and you think that is okay, but when you live in self-deceit it is the worst form of any deceit.
However, superficial digital change can be a dangerous form of self-deceit. The CEO's commitment must be grounded in deep fundamentals, such as genuine customer value, a real business model concept and disciplined economics," said Raskino.
Bush's last year in office, his former press secretary, Scott McClellan, wrote a tell-all book concluding that the Iraq War was a "serious strategic blunder" based on the "ambition, certitude and self-deceit" of a White House that was not fully honest with the American people.
I recall enough about the Faustus myth to anticipate encountering a character whose self-absorption, self-deceit, overweening pride, ambition, predatory ego, deviousness, ruthlessness, and lust persuade him to bargain with the Devil.