self-effacement


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self-ef·fac·ing

(sĕlf′ĭ-fā′sĭng)
adj.
Not drawing attention to oneself; modest.

self′-ef·face′ment (-fās′mənt) n.

self-effacement

n
the act of making oneself, one's actions, etc, inconspicuous, esp because of humility or timidity

self′-efface′ment



n.
the act or fact of keeping oneself in the background, as in humility.
[1865–70]
self′-effac′ing, adj.
self′-effac′ingly, adv.
self′-effac′ingness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.self-effacement - withdrawing into the background; making yourself inconspicuous
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"

self-effacement

noun
Reserve in speech, behavior, or dress:
Translations

self-effacement

[ˌselfɪˈfeɪsmənt] Nmodestia f, humildad f
References in classic literature ?
Ward, original literary gifts, are willing to make a long act of self- denial or self-effacement [20] for the benefit of the public.
At half-past ten Tibby, with rare self-effacement, fell asleep, and Margaret was able to drive her aunt to the station.
This self-effacement in both directions had been quite in consonance with her independent character of desiring nothing by way of favour or pity to which she was not entitled on a fair consideration of her deserts.
But so aloof is he from general suspicion, so immune from criticism, so admirable in his management and self-effacement, that for those very words that you have uttered he could hale you to a court and emerge with your year's pension as a solatium for his wounded character.
The old instinct of deference and humility was there; the habit of decent self-effacement and knowledge of her "own place." But there mingled with it a certain mild audacity, born of the occasion and of a sense, probably, of Newman's unprecedented approachableness, and, beyond this, a vague indifference to the old proprieties; as if my lady's own woman had at last begun to reflect that, since my lady had taken another person, she had a slight reversionary property in herself.
I have heard to-night similar, but even more offensive, sentiments from the person who has just sat down, and though it is a conscious effort of self-effacement to come down to that person's mental level, I will endeavor to do so, in order to allay any reasonable doubt which could possibly exist in the minds of anyone.' (Laughter and interruption.) `I need not remind this audience that, though Professor Summerlee, as the head of the Committee of Investigation, has been put up to speak to-night, still it is I who am the real prime mover in this business, and that it is mainly to me that any successful result must be ascribed.
Though himself much more of a public man than the judge, he conveyed exactly the fine shade of self-effacement before the King's justice; and though everyone looked at him as they would at the Prime Minister or the Archbishop of Canterbury, they could have said nothing of his part in it but that it was that of a private gentleman, with an accent on the noun.
"I wouldn't ever have it said that I stood in the way of a poor girl like Mattie marrying a smart fellow like Denis Eady," Zeena answered in a tone of plaintive self-effacement.
Chidley challenges Edwards on his own grounds while subverting the conventions of the genre through an open-ended rhetoric of subtle self-effacement. In the following chapter, Nevitt alters the scholarly discussion of responses to the regicide by demonstrating how rhetorics of silence and self-effacement became gendered through the "masculinization of the political subject" (54) in republican discourse and the adoption of female figures as symbols of royalist grief.
Jeremy Noel-Tod writes for The Guardian that, 'Haynes is the equal of Muldoon, Heaney or Hill, while his philosophical self-effacement is all of his own.
Simborowski makes the point that the self-effacement of the narrator parallels Ginzburg's reluctance to speak out on behalf of women, and that both are the result of insecurity, ambivalence, and unease regarding the position of women in Italian society.
The best he could do yesterday therefore, in terms of defending what remains of his credibility, was a show of false modesty and self-effacement and to admit (since he clearly felt it wise to admit something) that he'd been carried away by the euphoria surrounding Labour's 1997 general election win.