self-esteem

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self-es·teem

(sĕlf′ĭ-stēm′)
n.
Pride in oneself; self-respect.

self-esteem

n
1. respect for or a favourable opinion of oneself
2. an unduly high opinion of oneself; vanity

self′-esteem′



n.
self-respect.
[1650–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.self-esteem - a feeling of pride in yourself
pride, pridefulness - a feeling of self-respect and personal worth

self-esteem

noun self-respect, confidence, self-confidence, courage, vanity, boldness, self-reliance, self-assurance, self-regard, self-possession, amour-propre (French), faith in yourself, pride in yourself Poor self-esteem is at the centre of many difficulties.

self-esteem

noun
A sense of one's own dignity or worth:
Translations

self-esteem

[ˌselfɪsˈtiːm] Namor m propio

self-esteem

[ˌsɛlfɪsˈtiːm] nstima di sé

self-esteem

(selfiˈstiːm) noun
a person's respect for himself. My self-esteem suffered when I failed the exam.

self-esteem

n autoestima
References in classic literature ?
They have their own nature; they can of themselves minister to our self-esteem by the demand their qualities make upon our skill and their shortcomings upon our hardiness and endurance.
I suppose that the entity of the poet may be represented by the number ten; it is certain that a chemist on analyzing and pharmacopolizing it, as Rabelais says, would find it composed of one part interest to nine parts of self-esteem.
And what he saw in this mirror did not gratify his self-esteem.
I have offended the predominant sense in your nature--your sense of self-esteem.
Indeed, place this reversed skull (scaled down to the human magnitude) among a plate of men's skulls, and you would involuntarily confound it with them; and remarking the depressions on one part of its summit, in phrenological phrase you would say --This man had no self-esteem, and no veneration.
It affords you then an inordinate amount of self-esteem.
In short, we are madly erring, through self-esteem, in believing man, in either his temporal or future destinies, to be of more moment in the universe than that vast "clod of the valley" which he tills and contemns, and to which he denies a soul for no more profound reason than that he does not behold it in operation.
Concino Concini, and his wife Galligai, who subsequently shone at the French court, sought to Italianize the fashion, and introduced some Florentine tailors; but Percerin, touched to the quick in his patriotism and his self-esteem, entirely defeated these foreigners, and that so well that Concino was the first to give up his compatriots, and held the French tailor in such esteem that he would never employ any other, and thus wore a doublet of his on the very day that Vitry blew out his brains with a pistol at the Pont du Louvre.
The deference to his mother implied in Mercy's questions gently flattered his self-esteem.
The Lord never made either year face or head for X What good can your bumps of ideality, comparison, self-esteem, conscientiousness, do you here?
The old prince knew that if he told his daughter she was making a mistake and that Anatole meant to flirt with Mademoiselle Bourienne, Princess Mary's self-esteem would be wounded and his point (not to be parted from her) would be gained, so pacifying himself with this thought, he called Tikhon and began to undress.
The boy was distinguished both by his brilliant ability and by his immense self-esteem.