self-exculpatory

self-exculpatory

adj
intended to excuse oneself from blame or guilt
References in periodicals archive ?
In Billy Wilder's Double Indemnity (1944), the two protagonists might be correct that they are on a ride "straight down the line" which they cannot "get off," as some of the most famous lines of the film put it, but they use this in a self-serving, self-exculpatory way (96).
He said: "That's what credible business and economic voices - including the IMF - are calling for, instead of the self-exculpatory ramblings of the current Wales Office.
639) The court discussed Jones (1980) at length and analogized to Jones in explaining how, given that Murphy's self-exculpatory testimony contradicted Bell's alibi and not only placed Bell at the scene of the crime but also had him talking with the victim and giving Murphy her car keys, "It is apparent that Murphy's testimony could only be more damaging to Bell, if he had testified that he saw Bell rob Ms.
His glorious self-promotion in these rancid self-exculpatory memoirs has been given the full blessing of the state he so misserved.
In it, Buckley made the self-exculpatory point that he was no longer in charge, but he also offered a professorial pat on the back by stating that he had taken my criticisms seriously enough to forward them to the editorial staff.
These often lead the parties, honestly but mistakenly, to reinterpret the past in self-exculpatory or vengeful terms.
Indeed, because the errant pilot Harry Schmidt's extended self-exculpatory interview effectively closes the book, his excuses take on a weight they probably do not merit: he certainly deserved some stronger rebuttal.
This self-exculpatory plea should not be dismissed out of hand.
My major criticism of the show is the self-exculpatory film at its conclusion.
As a teacher, I immediately saw this as both self-deceptive and self-exculpatory: self-deceptive because students truly prepared for a test would not fear failing it, and self-exculpatory because it shifts the blame for the anticipated failure from the students (who, after all, "were" ready) to (guess who?
He does, however, include a transcript of his defense speech, which is a fascinating account of the insoluble conflict of obligations he faced and a muted challenge to his accusers' self-exculpatory scapegoating impulses.
Even active party members were tempted to cast themselves as opponents of the regime, if not outright victims of persecution, for having sided with the church leadership in the culture wars of the 1930s, thereby foreclosing any serious consideration of their affinity with the Nazi project--a self-exculpatory impulse only reinforced, as Clemens Vollnhals and others have shown, by the ham-handedness of American denazification policies, which typically excluded the possibility of shifts in attitude over time.