self-forgetting


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self-forgetting

adjective
Without concern for oneself:
References in classic literature ?
Intoxicating joy and self-forgetting, did the world once seem to me.
You have it in your power to raise two human beings from a state of actual suffering to such unspeakable beatitude as only generous, noble, self-forgetting love can give (for you can love me if you will); you may tell me that you scorn and detest me, but, since you have set me the example of plain speaking, I will answer that I do not believe you.
"She was a blessed woman," said Dinah; "God had given her a loving, self-forgetting nature, and He perfected it by grace.
Some touch of compunction smote the boy's hardening heart as he looked upon her, his patient little nurse in infancy, his patient friend, adviser, and reclaimer in boyhood, the self-forgetting sister who had done everything for him.
The great self-forgetting that art-making entails isn't a
Thus, as a result of this repeated self-forgetting on the part of consciousness, each form of consciousness finds itself repeatedly re-confronting its object as if it were not consciousness itself but an "other" which is "independent" of or "outside" consciousness.
Without a modicum of eros, or passion, there is no true agape, self-forgetting love.
Francis states them well: "By self-forgetting we find." I believe that Lucky Jim is in many ways a spiritual biography.
[any] playful self-forgetting." It is exactly the kind of selfhood Birkin and Ursula talk about so often in Women in Love and indicates the kind of man Lawrence seems to have had always in mind and perhaps desired Birkin to be (103).
Mules investigates the allegorical role of remembering and 'self-forgetting' that enables the titular White to embark on a journey that offers less a sense of resolution than a moment of melancholy catharsis.
I would suggest that we ought to think, today in an era of climate change, about moralizing laments regarding human reason's self-loss alongside various post-human theorizations that human reason is constituted by a certain self-forgetting. The human animal or human eye is torn between spectacle (or captivation by the mere present) and speculation (ranging beyond the present at the cost of its own life).
First, to speak of doing the noble thing, as compared to the beautiful thing, more vividly captures that element of moral action and character that is self-sacrificing or self-forgetting. In this way, a reader is consistently reminded of the longing of the good human being--the morally virtuous person--to seek a good that is higher or more complete than his or her own.