self-ignite

self-ignite

vb (intr)
1. to ignite or catch fire spontaneously without any external spark or flame
2. (Automotive Engineering) (of diesel oil) to ignite when under pressure without any external spark

self′-ignite′



v.i. -ig•nit•ed, -ig•nit•ing.
to ignite without spark or flame.
[1940–45]
self′-igni′tion, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oil left on towels starts house fire COTTON towels or cloths used to clean up oil can self-ignite and set tumble driers on fire.
Oil cake / oil seeds stacks may self-ignite because of heat produced by bacterial fermentation of the stack including other large number of factors.
Aviation authorities have long known that the batteries can self-ignite, creating fires that are hotter than 1,100C.
District Manager for Gateshead Steve Stokoe, Tyne and Wear Fire and Rescue Service said: "Given the right atmosphere and the right amount of ventilation, materials soaked in products such as linseed oil can self-ignite and become extremely dangerous.
Large piles of combustible material are prone to self-ignite, because heat builds up within the pile and has nowhere to escape.
Here, during Scarpia's sacrilegious railings at the end of Act I (in counterpoint to the choir's Te Deum) Bauer's simple forest of cathedral pillar candles self-ignite in an unqualified coup de theatre.
C[yen] DSM said that it worked closely with Austrian-based Advanced Polymer Compounds (APC) a company specialised among other things in formulating and testing recipes in compounding processes, and succeeded in meeting the technological challenge of developing a product that does not self-ignite, drip or delaminate at temperatures of up to 250[euro]centsC.
b] < 100 then according to Olpinski coal does not tend to self-ignite, at [SZ.
The liquid fuel produced in this manner will not self-ignite but when fired under pressure injection, the coal particles explode when heated for rapid ignition and complete carbon combustion.
Spontaneous combustion is a fairly rare occurrence," he adds, though materials like metal filings and some lab chemicals, such as sodium or phosphorous, can also self-ignite.
This leads to the formation of multiple flame fronts in the cylinder, as part of the fuel self-ignites and another part is lit by the spark.