self-insure


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self-in·sur·ance

(sĕlf′ĭn-sho͝or′əns)
n.
Insurance of oneself or one's possessions against possible loss by regularly setting aside funds.

self′-in·sure′ v.
self′-in·sured′ adj.
self′-in·sur′er n.

self′-insure′



v.t. -insured, -insuring.
to protect (one's property or interests) by means of self-insurance.
[1930–35]
self′-insur′er, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meeting this requirement can be accomplished either by buying an insurance policy, or through obtaining authority from the DIR's Office of Self Insurance Plans (OSIP) to self-insure the businesses' workers' compensation liabilities.
Meeting this requirement can be accomplished either by buying an insurance policy, or through obtaining authority from the Department of Industrial Relation's Office of Self Insurance Plans to self-insure workers' comp liabilities.
According to the Society of Human Resource Managers, only 17.4 percent of small businesses are self-insured, while mid-sized firms (100-500 employees) self-insure about 30 percent of the time.
Although it would be more affordable to self-insure an AHP that provides coverage to employees across state lines, like large single-employer plans, the DOL affirmed that AHPs that self-insure will be treated as MEWAs.
Additionally, when a company opts to self-insure or retain more of their exposures, they are betting on their own ability to minimize financial losses and manage their own risks.
On average, organizations insure 59% of PP&E losses and self-insure 28%, compared to insuring 15% of cyber exposure and self-insuring 59%.
Employers self-insure their health plans to get more control over the plans, and to take advantage of federal rules that preempt state efforts to regulate employee benefits.
Employers can use ERISA exemptions to self-insure, or operate self-funded health plans outside the reach of state group insurance benefits regulations.
But smaller businesses self-insure at a much lower rate; HHS estimates that fewer than 30 percent of businesses with 100 to 499 employees self-insure.
Medical stop-loss provides catastrophic coverage for employers that self-insure their employees' health benefits.
Only about 26 percent of employers with between 100 and 499 employees self-insure, compared with more than 82 percent of employers with 500 or more employees, according to data from the U.S.
(1) Further, within the confines of Rhode Island law, the director of the State of Rhode Island Department of Business Regulation (hereinafter "DBR") is authorized to promulgate rules and regulations that allow persons or entities with sufficient finances to self-insure. (2) In Peloquin v.