self-pitying


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Related to self-pitying: clingy

self-pit·y

(sĕlf′pĭt′ē)
n.
Pity for oneself, especially exaggerated or self-indulgent pity.

self′-pit′y·ing adj.
self′-pit′y·ing·ly adv.
Translations

self-pitying

[ˌselfˈpɪtɪɪŋ]
A. ADJautocompasivo
B. Nautocompasión f
References in periodicals archive ?
Maybe finally we can concentrate on the victims rather than the tedious self-pitying moans of the offenders.
Eddy's revelation shakes Dwight out of his self-pitying fug and he tidies his appearance then drives back to West Virginia to dole out what he perceives as justice to Will.
Stating that Pieterson had attempted to bulldoze over the terms of his central contract, Booth wrote that the batsman was self-pitying, claiming that he had been never looked after.
Harry's a good guy, but he needs to guard against coming across as whingeing and self-pitying.
Working together, Julie gets to see another, less self-pitying side of him, but is their relationship about to become more than just professional?
RICHARD Huddleston (Political Correction, Mailbag, January 28) writes about innocent jokes on football terraces and in pub toilets against a list of what he calls self-pitying groups.
A smug, self-pitying sleepwalk through celebrity culture, it might make her Hollywood pals smirk but it will likely make you snore.
Yet they're still winners while Sharpe is just self-pitying
Darcy commands the stage in a difficult role; her Maureen can be shy, saucy or taunting - sometimes all at once - but rarely is she self-pitying.
The central idea of the clumsily contrived script by Martin Sherman (Bent) and Zeffirelli is that pill-popping, self-pitying recluse Callas gets coaxed by her gay long-time manager-booking agent (Jeremy Irons, chain-smoking, ponytailed, and livelier than usual) into making a film of Carmen in which she will lipsynch to recordings made during her vocal prime.
Their loyal, humorously self-pitying friend Ellis comes to their aid in their adventures, but danger looms when Ryan, as the brave gladiator Spartacus, challenges the school bully--and then finds himself transformed into Gandhi when it is time to fight him.
They are only having self-pity on themselves when their children are watching them and then they'll grow up as self-pitying .