self-policing


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

self-po·lic·ing

 (sĕlf′pə-lē′sĭng)
n.
The detection and prevention of dangerous, inappropriate, or illegal acts without use of an external authority.

self′-po·lic′ing adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
LaFrenere said enforcement of the ban is not anticipated to be a problem, with some level of self-policing expected once the public has been educated of the new policy.
Terrorists don't self-police, so we cannot rely on a self-policing system.
I think this initiative, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, is important for the example it sets of self-policing, the role industry members have in reining in rogue players, and the model it now sets for other self-regulatory efforts the dietary supplement industry critically needs.
The Independent Complaints Panel, who carried out a drinks audit on behalf of the Portman Group - the alcohol industry's self-policing watchdogs - also raised concerns that the drink's packaging places undue emphasis on the strength and intoxicating effect of the ale.
His figures are also way off, she was supposed to pay back PS45,000 but the self-policing MPs committee reduced it to a fraction of that sum.
Better self-policing within scientific fields could lead to greater understanding and more useful results.
It emerged yesterday that David Cameron's depressingly failed to fulfil a promise of "robust" examination of rival self-policing regulation.
The auditor general reported that state regulators were unable to assure that the radioactive levels of waste brought into Utah was incompliance with state requirements because the division relied too heavily on self-policing by the generators and shippers of the waste.
A Facebook spokesman said the network was reliant on self-policing by its global network of one billion users.
Self-policing can't work and tests must be mandatory.
Rick Ketchum, head of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the self-policing body for the securities industry, said the question is "a matter of regulatory concern" for his organisation and the Securities and Exchange Commission.
Much of the discussion takes place in the context of traditional Indian self-policing societies in rural India, where caste 'panchayats' or tribal heads enforce the rules of the community.