self-promotion


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self-pro·mo·tion

(sĕlf′prə-mō′shən)
n.
Promotion, including advertising and publicity, of oneself effected by oneself.

self′-pro·mot′er n.
self′-pro·mot′ing adj.

self-promotion

n
the act or practice of promoting one's own interests, profile, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
The desire to elevate your own personal status while limiting opportunities for potential rivals can lead to a number of negative behaviors, including self-promotion, credit-stealing, backstabbing and finger-pointing, says leadership coach Dan Rockwell.
Though the campaign is designed for self-promotion, participating teams will all be donning a small sticker on the back of each player's helmet.
We compiled a list of authors who go beyond self-promotion and, we're sure, will brighten your timelines and make social media a more habitable place.
While Rahul gave the Prime Minister 'F' grade for agriculture, foreign policy, fuel prices, job creation, he has given him 'A+' for slogan creation and self-promotion.
Hearing a case regarding government-sponsored promotional material, the CJP deemed using pictures for self-promotion as inappropriate.
CJP also directed Sindh government to reimburse all the money spent on self-promotion to kitty.
'We do not have any concern with the advertisement but public money should not be spent on self-promotion,' remarked CJP.
The movement provides women and other underrepresented groups with the tools for effective and positive self-promotion through an interactive workshop.
The self-presentational strategies included ingratiation, exemplification, self-promotion, intimidation, and supplication (Jones & Pittman, 1982).
THINK OF YOUR stereotypical cheesy nomadic artist roaming the land, full of bluster and self-promotion. Now understand Mark Kowalchuk is the opposite.
He has always claimed he's a straight talker but this obviously only applied to his self-promotion on TV and radio and not to concerned citizens in the South East.
Western universities have been engaged for three decades years in what has been called 'mission stretch' (Scott, 2009)--as central government funding has declined in real terms, academics have been required to engage either in entrepreneurial activity, partnerships or self-promotion in order to meet their career and research goals--and to meet those of their employers.

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