self-revelation


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self-rev·e·la·tion

(sĕlf′rĕv′ə-lā′shən)
n.
Revelation of one's thoughts, emotions, or attitudes, intentionally or unintentionally.

self′-re·veal′ing (-rĭ-vē′lĭng) adj.

self-revelation

n
disclosure of one's private feelings, thoughts, etc, esp when unintentional
References in classic literature ?
Curiosity being one of the forms of self-revelation, - a systematically incurious person remains always partly mysterious.
When he pronounces "I Am!," he is not merely claiming his self-revelation; his words are a conscious echo of the Hebraic name for the Being who spoke to Moses from the burning bush.
For example, he suggests that the emphasis on self-revelation in public speaking led to orators' being judged by private virtues such as "prudence, temperance, self-control, honesty, and .
For me what emerges is an increased understanding of American culture, in a time of revolution, marked by a series of polarities or tensions: public versus private; natural versus theatrical; self-control versus self-revelation; originality versus the 'self-evident'.
Her posthumously published letters and diaries, describing her thwarted love and the desperation that drove her to suicide, rank with those of August Strindberg in the frankness of their self-revelation.
An abrasive character, we might say, to be admired for the burning sincerity of his beliefs and excused for the touching naively of his unconscious self-revelation, but hardly an ideal spiritual teacher.
Cassirer, the philosopher of philosophic forms, maintains that the sensuous forms of our words and imagery in the arts, sciences, myth, and religion are "forms of [our] own self-revelation." And through market research, Gerald Zaltman has learned that "there are people who are not very articulate verbally but ...
They regarded natural theology as a kind of idolatry in which the human mind fabricates its own ideas of God in place of God's own self-revelation. Strangely, both Ayer and Barth, in spite of their expressed disbelief in natural theology, eventually became Gifford Lecturers, and surely this meant that they accorded some recognition to the subject.
Then comes the kind of self-revelation in this book that makes it fascinating.
Revelation is understood as an interpersonal event and encounter that is the all-embracing reality of God's self-revelation as Truth itself.
Frequently, the evidence for God considered by philosophers is personally detached, ignoring whether our human wills are properly oriented to receive God's self-revelation on God's terms--not our own.
The saving self-revelation of God occurs only within the community of faith.