self-sow


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self-sow

(sĕlf′sō′)
intr.v. self-sowed (-sōd′), self-sown or self-sowed, self-sow·ing, self-sows
To reproduce or spread by natural dispersion of seed: a plant that self-sows readily.

self-sow

(or self-seeding) A term that describes a plant that, without assistance, sheds viable seed which germinate around the parent plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Set mint too--but keep in a container and watch it: This aggressive herb can self-sow or spread by its roots, even through the drainage hole in the bottom of the pot.
Author Kristin Green will discuss her new book, "Plantiful: Start Small, Grow Big with 150 Plants That Spread, Self-Sow, and Overwinter,'' 1 p.
Some plants that self-sow too freely--especially perennials such as garlic chives or horseradish--will cross the line into weediness if not handled with care.
This plant never fails to self-sow, but beware if you have small children for the seeds are highly noxious.
They can be grown in sun or partial shade and will self-sow once established.
This clumping goldenrod is drought-and heat-tolerant, making it a great choice for dry meadow landscapes where it can self-sow.
If you want a more organised display, collect the seeds before they self-sow, so you can control where they appear.
Many varieties self-sow freely, so you may be blessed with volunteer seedlings next season.
Other than a few plants such as hollyhocks and plants that we wish to self-sow, plants should not be allowed to set a crop of seed.
Butterfly bush also has the capability to self-sow but who ever has too many butterfly bushes?
Annuals such as portulaca, bachelor's button, California and some other annual poppies, as well as pansies and violas (themselves biennials treated as annuals), when located in sun, soil and with moisture to their liking, will often self-sow.
And the seeds that fall to the ground will self-sow.