self-sow

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self-sow

(sĕlf′sō′)
intr.v. self-sowed (-sōd′), self-sown or self-sowed, self-sow·ing, self-sows
To reproduce or spread by natural dispersion of seed: a plant that self-sows readily.

self-sow

(or self-seeding) A term that describes a plant that, without assistance, sheds viable seed which germinate around the parent plant.
References in periodicals archive ?
If self-sowing is a problem, deadheading their seed heads before they have the opportunity to spew their seeds about the garden will solve the trouble.
Also removing the flower heads of perennials and herbs before they go to seed will prevent unwanted self-sowing of plants, especially in adjacent paths or patios.
Self-sowing, and suckers in the variable width lane with the clearance of cut offspring and suckers.
Working with reseeding, or self-sowing, crops saves time and trouble and often gives excellent results, but a few special techniques and precautions are in order.
It is a low-growing, billowy ground cover that moves softly through the garden, self-sowing where the soil is well-drained.
For its 36 years, Pilobolus has been a self-sowing organism, generating collaborative dances from within its own family.
SELF-SOWING and pollinating so new colours appear from time to time - 5 for pounds 5.
Other good candidates are self-sowing seedlings including Californian poppies (Eschscholzia californica), hellebores, Verbena bonariensis and wallflowers.
It's a mix of corn cockle, godetia, honeywort, and California poppies that came up on its own several years ago and has been self-sowing for repeat performances ever since.
My garden consists almost entirely of perennials, bulbs, self-sowing biennials and self-sowing annuals.
One of the most rewarding buttercup family plants is the self-sowing annual larkspur or delphinium (Consolida ajacis).
Then the plant can be left to perpetuate itself by self-sowing.