selfishness


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self·ish

 (sĕl′fĭsh)
adj.
1. Concerned chiefly or excessively with oneself, and having little regard for others: a selfish child who wouldn't share toys.
2. Showing or arising from an excessive concern with oneself and a lack of concern for others: a selfish whim.

self′ish·ly adv.
self′ish·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Selfishness

 
  1. The force of selfishness is as inevitable and as calculable as the force of gravitation —Anon
  2. A man is a lion in his own cause —Henry G. Bohn’s Handbook of Proverbs
  3. The private life of the narcissist, like the private parts of the exhibitionist, ought not to be hung out uninvited in the public space —Willard Gaylin
  4. Self-love … leaped back into her like a perpetually coiled snake —Anais Nin
  5. Wound up in his own concerns like thread on a spool —Anon
Similes Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1988 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.selfishness - stinginess resulting from a concern for your own welfare and a disregard of others
stinginess - a lack of generosity; a general unwillingness to part with money
greediness, rapaciousness, voraciousness - an excessive desire for wealth (usually in large amounts); "the greediness of lawyers"
opportunism, self-interest, self-seeking, expedience - taking advantage of opportunities without regard for the consequences for others
unselfishness - the quality of not putting yourself first but being willing to give your time or money or effort etc. for others; "rural people show more devotion and unselfishness than do their urban cousins"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

selfishness

noun egotism, self-interest, self-centredness, greed, looking out for number one (informal) The selfishness of these people never ceases to amaze me.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

selfishness

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
أنانِيَّه
sobeckostsobectví
egoisme
itsekkyys
eigingirni, sjálfselska
sebičnost
bencillikegoistlik

selfishness

[ˈselfɪʃnɪs] Negoísmo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

selfishness

[ˈsɛlfɪʃnɪs] négoïsme mself-knowledge [ˌsɛlfˈnɒlɪdʒ] nconnaissance f de soi
The more self-knowledge we have → Plus nous avons de connaissance de nous-mêmes ...
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

selfishness

nEgoismus m, → Selbstsüchtigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

selfishness

[ˈsɛlfɪʃnɪs] negoismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

self

(self) plural selves (selvz) noun
1. a person's own body and personality.
2. one's own personal interests or advantage. He always thinks first of self.
ˈselfish adjective
(negative unselfish) thinking of one's own pleasure or good and not considering other people. a selfish person/attitude.
ˈselfishly adverb
ˈselfishness noun
ˈselfless adjective
utterly unselfish. As a soldier, he showed selfless devotion to duty.
ˈselflessly adverb
ˈselflessness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Utterson ruminated awhile; he was surprised at his friend's selfishness, and yet relieved by it.
Astor, complained of their selfishness, their extortion, and their thievish propensities.
She liked him, however, upon the whole, much better than she had expected, and in her heart was not sorry that she could like him no more;-- not sorry to be driven by the observation of his Epicurism, his selfishness, and his conceit, to rest with complacency on the remembrance of Edward's generous temper, simple taste, and diffident feelings.
I noticed on that occasion how much selfishness there is even in a love like Mr.
I had resolved in my own mind that to create another like the fiend I had first made would be an act of the basest and most atrocious selfishness, and I banished from my mind every thought that could lead to a different conclusion.
The terrible moment of complete illumination had come to me, and I saw that the darkness had hidden no landscape from me, but only a blank prosaic wall: from that evening forth, through the sickening years which followed, I saw all round the narrow room of this woman's soul--saw petty artifice and mere negation where I had delighted to believe in coy sensibilities and in wit at war with latent feeling--saw the light floating vanities of the girl defining themselves into the systematic coquetry, the scheming selfishness, of the woman--saw repulsion and antipathy harden into cruel hatred, giving pain only for the sake of wreaking itself.
Her practiced policy, as well as her selfishness, counseled her to try the latter expedient first.
1932--their mistakes and ignorance, their doubts and fears and misapprehensions, their ethical delusions, their violent passions, their inconceivable sordidness and selfishness. These are the things that are so hard for us of this enlightened age to understand.
That is an emotion in which tenderness is an essential part, but Strickland had no tenderness either for himself or for others; there is in love a sense of weakness, a desire to protect, an eagerness to do good and to give pleasure -- if not unselfishness, at all events a selfishness which marvellously conceals itself; it has in it a certain diffidence.
Verily, an appropriator of all values must such bestowing love become; but healthy and holy, call I this selfishness.--
The selfishness of a mean and crafty man--the selfishness of an ambitious and silly woman the selfishness of a spiteful and loveless child all tend one way, from bad to worse!
"I am greatly surprised by such a question," said the Cashier; "it sounds as if you suspected me of selfishness. Gentlemen, I applied that money to the purpose for which I took it; I paid it as an initiation fee and one year's dues in advance to the Treasurer of the Cashiers' Mutual Defence Association."